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POINTS ON SCORING. 

E. Young of the National League, gives the ap- 



I'resident N. 
pe-nded points on scoring under the new rules, which official 
scorers will do well to make a note of. Mr. Young says: 

I have received a large number of queries relative to the de- 
partment of scoring, particularly as affected by the recently 
adopted amendments to the League code. Without reflecting at 
all upon the official scorers of the National League, I would say 
that I do not think the high value of accuracy, care and impar- 
tiality in recording the points of contest is fully appreciated, A 
ball player has no appeal from the decision of a scorer as to a 
base hit, an error or an assist, yet these points, insignificant in 
themselves, go to make up the record upon which the player to a 
great degree depends for reputation and employment. The 
temptation to assist the players of the local team by granting hits 
.aTKl exempting frelders from errors is frequently alluring, and 
nothing would be more natural than an occasional yielding 
thereto, though I believe the official corps to be animated by a 
genuine spirit of fairness. 

It may not be out of place to say a word right here with regard 
to the work of the newspaper scorers, whose daily reports of 
games go far to mould the public estimation of a player's value. 
It is from these reports that the first monthly averages are com- 
piled, and the prestige of rank is enjoyed by the players who may 
have been favored by the scorer. While I do not think this par- 
tiality has acquired the proportious of a great evil, it is neverthe- 
less a decidedly objectionable feature, entirely distinct from the 
legitimate " booming " which is the exponent of local pride, and 
which exercises a healthy influence on the sport. With the de- 
velopment of the game, however, and with the increased attention 
paid to it by the most influential of our journals, I look for much 
improvement in this respect. While the amendments to the 
meager scoring rules of our elub are. immaterial, yet the changes 
in the playing regulations are so radical as to affect vitally the 
recording of the points. 

I have been asked: Suppose A reaches first on called balls; the 
pitcher sends the next three men to base in like manner, forcing 
A to home plate; is the run earned? I would say, most emphatr 
ically, yes. The new rules give a batsman the premium of a 
base hit for patiently waiting for a good ball, and though the 
pitcher is fined to the same extent, any run so gained is earned. 

This query has also been propounded: A reaches first on a safe 
hit; B forces him out at second — no chance for. a double play; B 
finally scores a hit; is B's run earned? To this I would answer, 
no. A man must earn his first. Had A not occupied the base B 
would probably have been retired. It would be manifestly unfair 
to credit B with an earned run after he had forced a man out by 
his weak batting and scored on the hits of other players. The 




— . 



same rule would, of course, hold were B to reach first on being 
struck by the pitcher, or upon an illegally delivered ball. 

I have seen it stated that the pitcher is not to receive an assist 
for a strike-out under the amended rules. This is an error, the 
rule expressly providing that the pitcher shall be given an assist as 
well as a credit for the strike-out in the summary. 

There is a little point which sometimes escapes a scorer to which 
more attention should be paid. When a game ends on an odd 
half inning the score of course reverts to the last even innings. 
In the hurry of closing up the record of the game hits, assists and 
errors scored in the last half played are often allowed to stand. 
These may make an important difference in individual averages 
and should be carefully cancelled. 

I have been asked where the line of demarkation lies between 
a base hit for a batsman and an error for a fielder. I am free to 
say that the distinction is frequently so fine as to be simply a 
matter of personal opinion, though a few general consideralions 
should govern the mnjority of cases. In the first place I would 
adopt the player's standpoint in scoring hits. It is of course 
impossible for the scorer to accurately estimate the ability of each 
particular fielder, nor can he tell whether the players are in good 
form. While these important points cannot weigh with the re- 
porter, he can judge as to the honesty and sincerity of the effort 
made, and the result obtained should be considered in that light. 
"Record players" are soon recognized and should be unsparingly 
dealt with. The fielder of the future is the man who tries for 
everything, and allows his "average" to look out for itself. 

Hot drives to the infield should he held or handled if they go 
directly to a player. A first baseman is sometimes to be excused 
for failing to hold a liner from a left-handed batsman, for those 
hitters certainly screw a ball-around to first with terrific force, but 
balls batted directly to a fielder should not go through him. There 
is a certain bound in the outfield, between the short-bound — 
which is easily picked up "by the skilful player — and the long 
bound, which can be judged with little difficulty. It strikes a few 
feet in front of a fielder and is liable to carom at any angle, usually 
leaving the ground sharply and going over the fielder's shoulder. 
If the player stops it he is assisted by chance to a great degree 
and should not be given an error if he fails to do so'. 

To score an error against a fielder who makes a long, hard run 
for a fly, the ball should strike his hand fairly and constitute a 
palpable muff. These catches are brilliant points in fielding, and 
attempts at them should be encouraged in every legitimate way. 

In conclusion, I would say that the scorer who views each play 
with cool, impartial judgment, recording for one side as he would 
for the other, will encounter remarkably few perplexities. 

N. E. Young, 
President National Ltague. 






\ 






President Young Issues a Series 
of Interesting -Instructions. 

President Young, of the -jjfctional 
League, last night sent out th< 
ing instructions to ufhpires: 
To IheM'mpi 'res &ftke National Tongue: 

i. l/iiave noted the following instructions and 
amplifications of the rules with a view 1© secur- 
ing tjfe greatest possible uniformity in admin- 
istering the revised code. 

Rule 5. section :;, contains the first radical 
change fromjthe old ' 1 Tn^jl fin 1 ^fct Jiyfl [ is 
too plain to require any special explanation or 
interpretation. The pitcher must face the bats- 
man, hoth shoulders square with the plate, with 
rear foot on the rear line of the box. It should 
not make any difference if heel projects a little 

The prohibition in the section against raising 
the right foot is not intended to bar the pitcher 
from doing so when throwing to a base, and 
refers to the delivery,, and the preparatory 
motions for delivery of the ball to the bat. 

Rule 7 in the closing sentence refers to a 
•'misinterpretation of the rules." Theintent of 
this-restriction upon players who are tempted 
to enter into argument with the umpire i> to 
bar all questions of fact. If the umpire makes 
abase d.-csi>:i : *. must stand without comment 
unless the captain shall deem that the umpire 
in formulating his judgment of the play puts a 
wrong construction upon the written law of the 
game. Kven in this event it should be remem- 
bered that the umpire is the sole judge, though in 
such a case he is at liberty to give the objecting 
captain a hearing. The umpire, however, is the 
supreme authority on the interpretation oT a 
rule during the progress of the game. 

Rule 13, section. 1 :. If both balls are hit over the 
fence in quick succession, let a new ball be fur- 
nished, even though one of the original two 
should come back during the interval of pro- 
ducing the new ball. TheohjectojF this rule is 
to expedite the game, and no technicalities 
should be allowed to stand in the way of the en- 
forcement of the }rue spirit of the regulation. 

Rule 13, section 4, refers to the ball becoming 
:ni-shapen. In enforcing this provision the 
question of degree should not be taken into con- 
sideration. If the umpire is satisfied that the 
ball is not practically a perfect sphere, should 
call for a new one. A ball not perfect! y reund 
will not take a true flight, nor will it bound at a 
natural angle. Tin I ion in shape 

should be taken at sufficient cause for the en- 
forcement of this rul 

Rule 19, regarding the clearing and policing of 
the grounds, should be reasonably construed, 
more especially on holidajfe. Umpires should 
remember that where lar«e crowds are assem- 
bled there are apt to be a number of hot heads 
ready to scUe any excuse for a disturbance, 
are should lie taken to avoid anything of 
this sort. The effect of riotous proceedings on 
a ball ground is very prejudicial to the best in- 
terests of the game, when, however, it be- 
comes neces.-;arv to enforce this regulation, it 

Shouldb ednnf pr ^"'p*lv nnil fjrtnly^ 

- 



'•■'■■ \. HCCtlOll ,, ...,-i| | .j> ar <l t (| lc 1 ,„1^ | 

Should be strictly enforced, and held to pro- 
hibit any ami every attempt to catch the runner 
by the aid of deceptive motions. 
Rule.-,!, section 3. This ruIMoes not iucltidean, 
■ Jjint the lm!lf% n .|i u 

trftpirts can veWSfeasily and readily 
'I distinguish between the twWases. In any ques- 

Jtion of rea.wnab.le doubt decide as per rule. A 
bunted. foul ball, or any obvious attempt to loul' 
the ball is a strike. If such strike be the fourth, 
1 the batter shall be declared out, and in ijOcase 
I shall a base be run on such strike. (This is an 
! accordance with the true intent and spirit of the 
' rule. 1 

Rule 47. section t. in striking out of turn, the 
player that should have gone to the bat is the 
one that is out. 

Rule ,|7, section 5, as to holding the fourth 
strike, under this rule, the batter is'out whether 
the ball is caught or not on the fourth strike if 
there Ls a man on first base and two men not 



occupying bases from taking 
as many bases as they can. But if the fourth 
strik*gtan be called by the umpire upon an 
is attempt to make, a foul hit, or a foul hit 
is made, no bases shall be run. The spirit of 
this rule should be remembered. It was dratted 
for the purpose of preventing a force-out or 
double-play on a fourth, strike intentionally 
mutred. As to whether the ball was so inten- 
tionally dropped has always been a vexing 
qttestron to decide. This regulation abolishes 
the distinction. 

Rule 4.5, section 4, gives the batsman a 
upon being hit by a ball. The fact 
strikes at the ball should not be taken ..,, 
siderntion, and this regulation should be care- 
fully dist.ngmshcd from the clause defining a 
dead ball i mpires should be very careful 

Rule .so, section 6, with regard to the fielder 
catching the ball in any part of his dress, in 

SSL??? l ?r e '■' alt " is " ot "'" if "icball slioiild 
fasten itself 111 the catcher's mask. This is 

S^ n I^ a ; 1 S C ?}. dc '" t ; a ? d shoultl nrjt be consid- 
ered a catch, though there is no fraud attempted • 

.n y „^ Pl .l yer ' " S '" U,C C:iSC ° f ••> «y Wtlg 

caught in the cap. 

J!Sj ?, 3 ' s « cU °» ', which refers to running 
°"<f d ?'»<;. t h'-ee-reet-lines in m: ' ki »S firs ' base 
should be liberally construed. It was intended 
to prevent any obstruction of fielder or baseman 
by the runner. Should the batted ball be a long 
By, for instance, the rule should not 'be 




con 
ner out for niaking a 
~ path to #et a good 

tier who having over- 

any attempt to go to 

btion from being put 

then turn to the right. 

he mav turn does not 



strued as potting the 
wide detour from the 
start. 

Rule 53, section 9. ., 
run first base then in 
second forfeits his ex 
out, even though he d 
The direction in wh 

exempt him from the liability which he as- 
sumes 111 attempting to go to second. The 
spirit, as weU as the letter of the law, should be 
borne in mn(d „, this instance. 

Rule 53, section it, if the ball has plainly 

I or been batted through a fielder, and the 

runner has run fairlv behind the fielder. 

he Should not be declared out if hit by the ball. 

It is no longer a fair batted ball. The intent of 

this rule was simply to prevent the runner from 

. of a batted 
umpire ularly careful 



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NICK YOUNG ON SCOKING. 

A CIRCULAR TO OFFICAL SCORERS OF THE 
LEAGUE. 



Players Should be Credited With Stolen 
Ba»e» Win- ii Krrortt arc Made, But 

tlie Hun, If Scored, M id Not be 

Given us Karned. 

Washington, April 23.— President Young this 
morning issued the following circular to all the 
scorers of the different League clubs: 
To the Official Scorers of Vie National Leayne : 

In reviewing the new code with a view to ascer- 
taining if there are any points to which the atten- 
tion of the official scorers should be drawn, I have 
come upon the provision crediting a stolen base to 
a runner when the same is secured through the 
assistance of a mis play, other than a battery 
error— an overthrow or fumble, for example. 

The philosophy of this credit is perfectly logical. 
The runner earns the base by making a daring 
attempt to secure it, and if successful, even 
though assisted by an error, deserves the point. 
These credits will, of course, be included in your 
official returns of stolen bases. 

We now come, however, to the point which I 
desire to emphasize. This querry has been pro- 
pounded to me: "Suppose a player reaches first 
base on a hit, steals to second on a fumble of the 
baseman and is batted home, is the run earned?" 
I answer no. The reason is obvious, but the point 
should be carefully borne in mind in filling out 
the earned run blank in your scoro sheets. Earned 
runs, it should be remembered, are not credited 
to individuals, nor do they have any particular 
bearing upon the status of a club in making up 
the averages which constitute the monthly and 
annual records. 

They are important factors, however, in guag- 
ing the effectiveness of a pitcher, and it is in this 
light alone that they should be regarded. It is, 
then, manifestly unfair to charge a pitcher with 
a run earned off his delivery, when bases secured 
by fielding errors are essential factors to it. 
Obviously the pitcher can in no way be responsi- 
ble for a muff by the baseman or an overthrow 
by the catcher. 

In computing earned runs, therefore, you will 
scan your scores carefully and omit tallies, in 
which the stolen base, assisted by au error, is a 
necessary element. Veay truly yours, 

N. E. Youno, 
President National League. 



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PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION. 

Includin? the ProceedingB of the Lengue Concress held in Chicaso 188(5, 
and New York 188?, and the Official Fielding and Battim; Aver- 
ages of Flayers in Championship Games in 188li. 



CHICAGO: 

PUBLISHED BY A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

108 Madison St., CHICAGO. Ml Broadway, NSW YORK. 

Copy r iff Ii led by A. G. SpaUing J- Jlros. t i8Sy. 



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DEX 



— TO THE- 



003STSTITXJTI03Sr - 



Section. 

Name r 

Objects 2 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Members for 1 8S6 , 

Not More than One Club Member from any City 

Population of Eligible City . 

Mode of Applying for Membership 5_6 

Election of Club Member 5 

Mode of Filling Vacancy in Club Membership 7 

Dues, Assessments, Fines, F^tc 8 

Guarantee Fund „ 

Termination of League Club Membership io 

" Membership, How Enforced H 

Membership of Umpire, Manager or Player 12 

Disqualified Persons, Secretary's Record and Notice .' 13 

OFFICERS. 

President, Election and Duties of r . 

Poard of Directors, Election of je 

Directors, Qualifications of j£ 

Board of Directors, Duties of !.'.'!..'.'. 17 

Meetings of ig 

Reports of !q 

Proceedings of, not to be Disclosed. ... 20 

Filling Vacancy in 21 

Secretary, how Elected \ \ 22 

to be Treasurer 2 , 

Genera] Duties of ........ 24 

to Record and Report Violations of Rules and 

Regulations 2 . 

Secretary, Salary and Guaranties 26 

(3) 



Zf 



INDEX TO THE CONSTITUTION 



LEAGUE CLUB, UMPIRES, MANAGERS AND 
PLAYERS. 

Section. 

Club, Jurisdiction of its Affairs 27 

" " " Territory 28 

Restriction as to Games 28 

Contract with Manager or Player 29 

Player not under Contract, what Games he May Play in. . . . 29 

Notice of Contract with Manager or Player 30 

Release from Contract, Notification of 31 

" " " Effect of ... 32 

When Manager or Player may Engage with Another Club. . 33 

When Manager or Player Becomes Ineligible 34 

Clubs Forbidden to Employ Disqualified Persons 35 

" " " Play Clubs Employing Disqualified 

Persons 36 

Manager or Player, when to Report Grievances 37 

" " " Cause of Expulsion of 38 

" " " " " Suspension of 39 

Umpire, Cause of Disqualification of 40 

The Umpire, how Appointed 41 

Umpire's Expulsion 42 

" Jurisdiction 43 

DISPUTES AND COMPLAINTS. 

Disputes between Clubs, how Adjudicated 44 

Complaint of Club against Manager or Player of another 

Club 45 

Complaint of Reserved Player against the Club Reserving 

Ilim .. 46 

Complaint of Player under Contract against his Club 47 

Appeal of Manager or Player 48 

When Director is Ineligible to Try a Case 49 

Expenses of Trials and Arbitrations 50 

Decision of Joint Arbitration Committee Final 51 

PLAYING RULES. 

When Enacted and Amended 49 

CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Championship to be Contended for yearly 53 

Season 54 

Games, What are 55 

" " Number of, in Series 56 

Tie, or Drawn Games, how Played off 56 

Home Club Entitled to Half of Series on its Grounds 57 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALI. CLUBS. 



Section . 

I Iome Club to Control Exhibition of Game 57 

" " to be Furnished Batting Order of Visiting Club. 57 

Championship Schedule 58 

Schedule Date not to be Changed Except 58 

Admission to Championship Game, Price of 50, 

Correspondence Concerning Championship Games, by whom 

Conducted .... . 60 

Receipts of Championship Games, Statement and Pay- 
ment of 61 

Admission to Championship Games, how Regulated 61 

League Games Forbidden Prior to Championship Season. . . 62 
Games between League and Non- League Clubs, Regula- 
tions Governing 63 

Games between League and Non-League Clubs, Division of 

Receipts (1, 3) 63 

Games between League and Non-League Clubs, Penalty for 

Non-Payment (3. 4) 63 

Count of Forfeit (James 64 

Drawn, Tie or Postponed Games not to Count but be 

Played off 65 

The Champion Club 66 

Emblem of Championship 67 

Mode of Deciding Championship 67 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Time and Place 68 

Delegates and Visitors 69 

Special Meetings, how Called 70 

Quorum 71 

Order of Business 72 

AMENDMENTS. 

Amendments to Constitution or Playing Rules (1) 73 

Suspension of Constitution (2) 73 



CONSTITUTION 

— OK THE — 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL GLUBS. 
1887. 



SECTION i. This Association shall be called 
League of Professional Base Hall Clubs." 



'The National 



OBJECTS. 

Sec. 2. The objects of this League are : 

1. To encourage, foster, anil elevate the game of base ball; to 
enact and enforce proper rules for the exhibition and conduct of 
the game, and to make base ball playing respectable and honor- 
able. 

2. To protect and promote the mutual interests of professional 
base ball clubs and professional base ball players, and, 

3. To establish and regulate the base ball championship of the 
United States. 

membership. 

Sec. 3. This League shall consist of such professional base 
ball clubs as may from time to time be elected to membership, but 
in no event shall there be more than one club from any city. 

Sec. 4. No club shall be admitted from any city whose popula- 
tion is less than seventy-five thousand (75,000), except by unani- 
mous vote of the League. 

Sec. 5. No club shall be admitted unless it shall first have de- 
livered to the Secretary of the League, at least five days before the 
annual meeting, a written application for membership, signed by 
its President and Secretary, accompanied by documents showing 
that such club bears the name of the city in which it is located, 

(6) 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



and that it is regularly organized and officered, and where the 
State law permits it, chartered. Such application shall at once be 
transmitted by the Secretary to the President of the League, who 
shall forthwith refer it to a committee of three members of the 
Board of Directors, appointed by him, who shall immediately in- 
vestigate and report upon said application; said report to be com- 
municated to the League through the Secretary. 

Skc. 6. The voting upon an application for membership shall 
be by white and black balls. Two black balls shall be sufficient 
to exclude the applicant, and no club shall be required under any 
circumstances to state how it voted upon such application. Such 
election shall take place at the annual meeting of the League. 
Provided, That should any eligible club desire to join the League 
after the adjournment of the annual meeting, it may make appli- 
cation in writing to the Secretary of the League, who shall at once 
communicate such application, together with any facts in his pos- 
session concerning such applicant, to the President of the League, 
who shall refer it to a special committee of the Hoard, as provided 
in Section 6; and upon receipt by the Secretary of the report of 
said committee, he shall transmit such application and report to 
all League clubs, each of whom shall, within ten days, transmit 
one written ballot for or against the admission of such applicant, 
to the Secretary, and if two adverse ballots be not cast, then the 
Secretary shall, upon receipt of the annual dues, notify such club 
of its election. 

Sec. 7. In case any League club shall forfeit its membership 
during the championship season, the Hoard of Directors may elect 
a non-League club to temporary membership in the League, which 
election shall entitle such temporary club member, without the 
payment of League club dues, to play all the championship sched- 
ule games remaining unplayed by the retired League club, upon 
the same terms and conditions as League clubs, except that such 
games shall not count in the championship series, and such tem- 
porary membership shall terminate at the next annual meeting of 
the League. 

DUES, ASSESSMENTS, FINES, ETC. 

Sec. 8. Every League club shall pay to the Secretary of the 
League on or before the first day of May of each year, the sum of 
one hundred dollars as annual dues; and on or before the twenty- 
fifth day of each month of the championship season, such other 
sum as may be lawfully assessed for the payment of salaries of of- 
ficers and umpires, and for such other expenses as may be in- 
curred by order of the League, or of the Hoard of Directors. 

(2.) Upon conviction of any of the offences prescribed in Sec- 
tion 10, as causes for expulsion — the Hoard of Directors may, in 
the first instance, as a preliminary to, or in lieu of expulsion, im- 



8 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION'. 



pose such a line as is in their judgment, commensurate with the 
injury; which fine may include a penalty payable to any other 
League club or clubs, as an equivalent for damages, sustained for 
such violation of this Constitution, or the legislation or contracts 
made in pursuance thereof. 

GUARANTEE FUND. 

Sec. 9 (i). Each club elected to membership shall within thirty 
days after official notice of such election — by its President or other 
chief executive officer — sign and affix its common seal to this con- 
stitution as a covenant to fulfil all the obligations and requirements 
thereof, and of all legislation and contracts made in pursuance 
thereof. 

It shall at the same time execute and deliver unto the President 
of the League, as Trustee for the other League Clubs, a bond 
with approved sureties in the penal sum of five thousand dollars 
($5,000), conditioned for the faithful performance of said Consti- 
tutional Covenants, and for the payment into the Guarantee 
Fund of the sum of five thousand dollars (•$5,000), in annual in- 
stallments of not less than one thousand dollars (.$1,000), payable 
during the month of May; any default to cause the forfeiture of 
said penal sum, and of all installments previously paid into said 
fund. 

(2.) The Guarantee Fund shall be invested by the Board of 
Directors in United States Government lionds, or in such other 
interest bearing-securities as the League in meeting shall direct. 
Said securities shall always be subject to the inspection of the 
League, or of its Auditing Committee appointed for the purpose. 

(3.) The interest and income accruing from such securities 
shall, as soon as collected, be transferred into the treasury in aid 
of the current and contingent expenses of the League. 

(4.) The principal of said fund shall, except as hereinafter 
stated, be kept intact as a guarantee against any violation of the 
provisions of this Constitution, or of the legislation and contracts 
made in pursuance thereof. 

f5.) The failure of a club to pay into said fund, when due, any 
annual installment of its contribution thereto, shall forfeit the full 
penal sum of its bond, and suit may at once be entered for the 
recovery of the same, or in lieu thereof, and in default of a collec- 
tion of the same, the Hoard of Directors, unless otherwise in- 
structed by the League, may expel said club from membership in 
the manner prescribed in Section II, when the installment or in- 
stallments already paid shall be forfeited, converted into cash and 
transferred into the treasury in aid of the current and contingent 
expenses of the League. 

(6.) Upon the acceptance of the resignation of a club from 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



9 



membership or upon the involuntary termination of such member- 
ship for "business reasons," as provided for in Section 10, said 
club shall be entitled to a return of its bond and of its entire con- 
tribution to the Guarantee Fund (less all dues, assessments, and 
fines chargeable thereon), either in cash or, at the option of the 
Board of Directors, in the securities in which the said cash may 
then be invested. 

(7.) Upon thirty days' default by a club — after due notice by 
the Secretary— in its payment of dues, assessments, or fines im- 
posed in pursuance of this Constitution, the Hoard of Directors 
shall declare forfeited an equivalent amount of said club's con- 
tribution to the GUARANTEE Fund, which equivalent amount, 
together with such additional fine for said default — as may be im- 
posed by said Board — shall be repaid within three months there- 
after, under penalty of forfeiture of the bond of said club and of its 
entire contribution to said fund, and of its expulsion from mem- 
bership. Provided, That nothing herein contained shall be con- 
strued to prohibit a collection by suit on said bond, either before 
or after expulsion, of any unpaid installments of said club's con- 
tribution to said fund requisite to satisfy and liquidate all arrears 
of said dues, assessments and fines. 

(8.) Upon a club's expulsion from membership for persistence 
in an unaccepted resignation, its entire contribution to the Guar- 
antee Fund shall be forfeited, and suit may be instituted on its 
bond for all unpaid instalments thereof. 

SEC. 10. The membership of any League Club may be ter- 
minated, 

(1.) By resignation duly accepted by a majority vote of all the 
League Clubs in meeting duly convened. 

(2.) By an adverse vote of two-thirds of the remaining League 
Clubs in meeting duly convened, when, for business reasons, such 
membership shall no longer be desirable. 

(3.) By expulsion in the manner prescribed in Section 11, for 
failure to sign the Constitution, and deliver the bond and pay its 
contributions to the Guarantkf. Fund as prescribed in Section 
9; or 

Failure to pay the visiting club the amount due under the pro- 
visions of Section 61 of this Constitution. 

Failure to present its nine at the time and place agreed upon to 
play any championship game unless caused by unavoidable acci- 
dent in traveling; or 

Selling or allowing to be sold upon its grounds, or in any build- 
ing owned or occupied by it during the championship season, any 
spirituous, vinous or malt liquors; or 

Allowing open betting or pool selling upon its grounds, or in 
any building owned or occupied by it; or 



/ 



10 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



Playing any game of ball with a club that is disqualified or in- 
eligible under this Constitution or the National Agreement of 
Professional Uase ball Clubs; or 

Offering, agreeing, conspiring, or attempting to lose any game 
of ball, or failing to immediately expel any player who shall be 
proven guilty of offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to 
lose any game of ball, or of being interested in any pool or wager 
thereon; or 

Taking part in any game of ball on Sunday with any other 
League Club. 

Disbandment of its organization or nine; or 

Failing or refusing to fulfill its contractual obligations with the 
other League Clubs; or 

Failing or refusing to comply with any lawful requirement of 
the Board of Directors; or 

Wilfully violating auy provision of this Constitution, or the 
Legislation or Playing Utiles made in pursuance thereof. 

Sec. ir. To carry into effect the provisions of Sections 9 and 
10 of this Constitution, the facts in any case covered by such sec- 
tions must be reported to the Secretary of the League, who shall 
at once telegraph the party charged with the specified default or 
offence, inquiring whether any dispute exists as to the facts 
alleged. In case the facts are disputed, the Board shall, after due 
notice, try the case under such regulations as they may prescribe, 
and their findings shall be final and conclusive on all parties ex- 
cept in case of expulsion, when such finding shall be forwarded 
to each League Club, which shall transmit to the Secretary writ- 
ten ballots "For Expulsion," or "Against Expulsion;" and if all 
League clubs vote "For Expulsion," the Secretary shall notify 
all League clubs of the forfeiture of membership of the party 
charged; and every club shall, on or after the receipt of such 
notice, govern its intercourse with such expelled member by the 
prohibitions and penalties prescribed by this Constitution. 

Sec. 12. (Par. 1.) The umpires, managers and players employed 
by the clubs belonging to this League shall be considered and 
treated as members hereof to the extent of being always amena- 
ble to the provisions of this Constitution, and entitled to all its 
privileges in matters of dispute, grievance or discipline, as pro- 
vided in this Constitution. 

(2.) Any umpire, manager or player, having forfeited member- 
ship, shall not be readmitted, except by unanimous vote of the 
League. 

Sec. 13. A list to be designated "the black list," shall be kept 
by the Secretary of the names of any persons who may be declared, 
by an affirmative vote of five League clubs, at any regular or 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



11 



special meeting, to be unworthy of service in the League, as um- 
pire, manager or player, and any person so named shall be disqual- 
ified for employment by, or service in any League club, until his 
name be removed from such list by unanimous vote of all League 
clubs at a regular or special meeting. (See paragraphs 4, 7 and 12 
of League contract). The Secretary shall immediately notify all 
League clubs of any name placed upon or removed from such 
list of disqualified persons. 



Sec. 14. At its annual meeting the League shall elect a Presi - 
dent by ballot. The President shall be ex officio chairman of the 
Board of Directors. lie shall preside at all the meetings of the 
League, and shall call special meetings of the League when he 
may deem it necessary, or when thereto requested by half of the 
clubs of the League. 

Should the office of President become vacant by death, resig- 
nation, or removal, the Board of Directors shall within thirty- 
days elect a President. 

Sec. 15. The affairs of this League shall be conducted and con- 
trolled by live Directors, who shall constitute "The Board," and 
who shall consist of the President and four members, to be chosen 
at the annual meeting, in the following manner: The name of 
each club, except that of which the President is a member, shall 
be plainly written upon a card, in full view of the delegates pres- 
ent, by the Secretary; the cards to be of the same size, shape, 
color and material. The cards shall then be placed in some suit- 
able receptacle, and well shaken together; thereupon four of these 
cards shall be drawn successively, and at random, and one 
delegate from each of the four clubs whose names are so 
drawn, shall, with the President, compose the Board, and if 
any club whose name is thus drawn be represented by two dele- 
gates, such delegate shall name one of their number to be a 
member of the Board: Provided, That at any time after the ad- 
journment of the annual League meeting, any League club repre- 
sented on the Board may substitute another representative; such 
substitution to be attested by written notice to the Secretary, 
signed by the President of the' League club, and upon receipt of 
such notice by the Secretary, such substitution shall take effect, 
and the Secretary shall thereupon notify all League clubs. 

Sec. 16. No person shall be qualified to act as Director who is 
not an actual member of the club he represents; nor shall any 
club, under any circumstances, be represented by more than one 
person on the Board. 

Sec. 17. The Board shall have the general supervision and 
management of all affairs and business of the League and 



^^B 



12 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



shall be individually answerable to the League for the faithful 
discharge of their trust. 

Sec. 18. The Hoard shall meet anuually on the morning of the 
third Wednesday in November at nine o'clock at the place where 
the annual meeting of the League is to be held, but may hold 
special meetings whenever urgent necessity may require. 

SEC. 19. The Board shall prepare a detailed report of all their 
doings, and present the same, in writing, to the League, at its 
annual meeting, which report shall, if accepted, be fded with the 
Secretary, together with all official papers, documents and prop- 
erty which may have come into their possession by virtue of their 
office. 

Sec. 20. Any Director who shall disclose or publish any of the 
proceedings of the Hoard, except officially through the report of 
the Board, or when called upon by vote of the League, shall for- 
feit his office. 

Sec. 21. In case of a vacancy in the Hoard by reason of the 
death, resignation, absence, or disqualification of any Director, 
the club of which he was a member at the time he was chosen 
shall designate his successor, and at once notify the Secretary. 
But if such vacancy is caused by the withdrawal, disbanding or 
disqualification of a club represented on the Board, the Board 
may fill the vacancy by election in the same manner as provided 
for the election of Directors in Section 15. 

Sec. 22. The Board shall elect a gentleman of intelligence, 
honesty and good repute, who is versed in base ball matters, but 
who is not in any manner connected with the press, and who is 
not a member of any professional base ball club, either in or 
out of the League, to be the Secretary of the Board and of the 
League. 

Sec. 23. The Secretary shall be the Treasurer of the League, 
and as such shall be the custodian of all funds of the League, 
receive all dues, fees and assessments, make such payments as 
shall be ordered by the Hoard, or by the vote of the League, and 
render annually a report of his accounts, and shall give such bond 
with approved sureties as the Board may require. 

Sec. 24. The Secretary shall have the custody and care of the 
official records and papers of the League; shall keep a true record 
of all meetings of the League and the lioard shall issue all official 
notices and attend to the necessary correspondence; he shall pre- 
pare and furnish such reports as may be called for by the Board, 
and shall be entitled to such books, stationery, blanks and mater- 
ials as the actual duties of his office may require. 

Sec. 25. The Secretary shall keep a record of all infractions of 
the rules and regulations of the League that may come to his 






I 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



13 



notice, and shall (except in cases covered by Sections u and 13) 
make a report on the same to the President, who shall present it to 
the Board at its next meeting. 

Sec. 26. The Secretary shall receive such salary as the Board, 
by vote, shall determine, and shall be reimbursed for all traveling 
expenses actually incurred by him in the service of the League; 
and the Board may exact from him such guarantees for the faith- 
ful performance of his duties as they may deem for the interest 
and safety of the League. At the expiration of his term of 
office, he shall account for and deliver up to the Board all the 
property and papers which may have come into his hands by vir- 
tue of his office. 



LEAGUE CLUBS, UMPIRES, MANAGERS AND PLAYERS. 

Sec. 27. Each club belonging to this League shall have the 
right to regulate its own affairs, to make its own contracts, to 
establish its own rules, and to discipline, punish, suspend, or 
expel its own manager, players or other employes, and these pow- 
ers shall not be limited to cases of dishonest play or open insubor- 
dination, but shall include all questions of carelessness, indiffer- 
ence, or other conduct of the player that may be regarded by the 
club as prejudicial to its interests: Provided, That all club regu- 
lations must be made subordinate to and in conformity with the 
general regulations established by this League, and no club shall 
prescribe any rule or regulation in conflict with any provision 
of this Constitution, or the Playing Rules. (See also League 
contract). 

Sec. 28. Every club member of this League shaH have exclus- 
ive control of the city in which it is located, and of the territory 
surrounding such city, to the extent of four miles in every 
direction from its corporate limits, and no visiting League club 
shall, under any circumstances — except with the consent of the 
local League club, until all League championship games on that 
ground shall have been finished, be allowed to play any club in 
such territory other than the League club therein located, nor 
shall a visiting League club play any game in April with any non- 
League club within the corporate limits of the city in which the 
League club is located, without the consent of the local League 
club. 

Sec. 2g. An agreement may be made between a club and a 
manager or player for services by the manager or player, and 
compensation therefor by the club, by telegram or other writing, 
and notice of such agreement may be sent by telegraph to the Sec- 
retary of the League, specifying the term of service agreed upon, 
and the Secretary shall, immediately upon the receipt of such 
notice notify all League clubs and all Associations, parties to the 



14 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION-. 



"National Agreement of Professional Iiase Ball Associations," 
that the said club has contracted with the said player for the period 
specified, and the contract thus made and promulgated shall be 
valid and binding upon all. Provided, That within thirty days 
from the date of making such agreement, the club and the player 
shall further evidence such agreement by the execution of a con- 
tract in the form prescribed by the League (see League contract), 
and the Secretary of the League shall, upon application, furnish 
each League club a suitable supply of the printed forms of 
contract adopted by the League, and in the event that the said 
player shall refuse within the said thirty days, to sign the said 
formal League contract, the said club shall notify the Secretary, 
who shall at once place the name of said player on the "Black 
List," and the player shall thereupon become disqualified, and 
the Secretary shall issue notice of such disqualification as provided 
in Section 13 of this Constitution. 

No player, not under one of the two forms of contract specified 
in this Section, shall be eligible to play in a League game, except 
that in case a player shall meet with an accident, or be expelled 
by his club, any player who is not otherwise disqualified, under 
the provisions of this Constitution, may take the place of such 
expelled or injured player; but such player shall not be eligible to 
play for more than five championship games in the nine of such 
club, without the contract and notice thereof required by this 
Section, or Section 30. 

Sec. 30. It shall be the further duty of a club within ten days 
after it shall have entered into a formal League contract with a 
manager or player, to transmit said contract to the Secretary of 
the League. If the Secretary shall find the contract to be in the 
form adopted by the League, he shall indorse upon it his certifi- 
cate to that effect, together with the date of its receipt by him, 
and at once return it to the contracting club. The Secretary 
shall also enter upon his records the names of the contracting 
club, and manager or player, and immediately notify all other 
League clubs of such contract, unless the notice specified in Sec- 
tion 29 has already been issued. In no case shall the Secretary 
give such certificate, or give notice of such contract, unless it 
comply, in all respects, with the form of contract adopted by the 
League, and no such contract shall be regarded as valid or bind- 
ing until it bears the Secretary's certificate as herein provided. 

Sec. 31. Any player while under contract with a League club, 
who shall, without the consent of such club, agree to enter the 
service of any other club after the expiration of such contract, shall 
be liable to expulsion by said League club. Whenever a club re- 
leases a manager or player without notice, or gives him ten days' 
notice of release, in accordance with paragraphs 15 or 20 of the 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



15 



League contract, and whenever it suspends or expels a manager or 
player, that club shall at once notify the Secretary, stating in case 
of release, the date when the same takes effect, and in case of sus- 
pension or expulsion, the cause thereof, and the Secretary shall at 
once notify all other clubs of the League. 

SEC. 32. Releases of players from contract or reservation, and 
future contracts with such players, shall be regulated and governed 
by the National Agreement of professional base ball clubs and the 
League legislation made in pursuance thereof. 

Sec. 33. A manager or player, whose contract has become void 
by reason of his club's disbanding, withdrawing from or losing its 
membership in the League, may engage for the remainder of the 
season with any other club immediately after the League Secretary's 
notice of such disbandment, withdrawal, or loss of membership. 

Sec. 34. No manager or player who has been suspended or ex- 
pelled from a League club, or suspended by the League under the 
provisions of Section 13 of this Constitution, shall at any time 
thereafter be allowed to play with or serve any League club (either 
the one expelling him or any other) unless the term of suspension 
by the club has expired, or upon his appeal to the Board, such 
suspension or expulsion shall have been set aside, or in any case 
under Section 13 his name shall have been removed from the black 
list by unanimous vote of the League, as provided in said section. 

Sec. 35. No club shall employ as umpire, manager, scorer, or 
player, any person who has willfully violated any provision of this 
Constitution, or of the Playing Rules, or who has been expelled 
from any club belonging to this League, or who shall be disquali- 
fied from playing with a club under any provision of this Con- 
stitution. 

Sec. 36. No game of ball shall be played between a League 
club and any other club that has been expelled from membership 
in this League. No game of ball shall be played between a 
League club and any other club employing or presenting in its 
nine a player expelled or under suspension from the League, or 
otherwise rendered ineligible by the National Agreement, or the 
legislation made in pursuance thereof. 

SEC. 37. Any manager or player who may consider himself ag- 
grieved or injured by any act of his club, or of any officer, agent 
or employe thereof, shall make his complaint thereof to the Presi- 
dent of the club when the club "nine" is at home. Any manager 
or player, under contract with a League club, who shall, without 
the written consent of such club, leave its service, or who shall be 
proven guilty cf offering, agreeing, conspiring, or attempting to 
lose any game of ball, or of being interested in any pool or wager 
thereon, shall be at once expelled by such club. 

Sec. 38. Any manager or player under contract with a League 



5f 

will, 



16 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION'. 



club, whose name shall be placed upon the black list provided for 
in Section 13 of this Constitution, in the manner therein provided, 
shall immediately upon receipt by such club of the Secretary's no- 
tice of such action, be discharged by such club from its service. 
(See paragraphs 4, 7 and 12 of the League contract.) 

Sec. 39. Any person under contract with a League club, who 
shall be guilty of drunkenness, gambling in any form, insubordi- 
nation, or of any dishonorable or disreputable conduct (except the 
offenses requiring expulsion, specified in Sec. 37), may be fined or 
suspended by such club for the remainder of the playing season, 
or for the remainder of that and all of the ensuing playing season, 
at the option of such club. And during the period of such sus- 
pension, such person shall be disqualified from playing in or 
against, or serving any League club: Provided, That the club 
having made the suspension shall net have power to rescind it or 
to curtail its duration. 

The President of the League shall have power, upon proper 
proof, to inflict a fine for any of such offences, not exceeding two 
hundred dollars ($200), which fine can only be remitted by the 
Board of Directors. (Sec. 6 League Contract.) 

Sec. 40. Any person who shall be proven guilty of offering, 
agreeing, conspiring, or attempting to cause any game of ball to 
result otherwise than on its merits under the Playing Rules, or 
who, while acting as Umpire, shall violate any provision of the 
Constitution, or of the Playing Rules adopted hereunder, may be 
forever disqualified by the President of the League from acting as 
Umpire of any game of ball participated in by a League club. 

nil'. UMPIRE, 

Sec. 41. A staff of four League Umpires shall be selected by 
the Secretary before the 1st day of May. 

(1.) Applications for such positions will be received by the Sec- 
retary until the 1st day of March. 

(2.) A written contract shall be made with each of the four 
Umpires selected, stipulating for his service from May 1 to Octo- 
ber 15, at a salary of one thousand dollars for such period, paya- 
ble in equal monthly payments, at the expiration of each month of 
service. He shall also be allowed and paid his actual expenses 
while absent from his home in the service of the League. 

(3.) He shall be under the sole control and direction of the 
Secretary, from whom he will receive all assignments to duty, and 
all instructions regarding the interpretation of the Playing Rules, 
aud the Secretary shall prescribe a proper uniform for him, all 
parts of which shall be worn when officiating as Umpire. 

(4.) In the event of the failure of such Umpire to umpire a 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION - . 



17 



game assigned to him, it shall be the duty of the Secretary to pro- 
vide a substitute to umpire such game, and in such case there 
shall be deducted from the next monthly payment to the League 
Umpire the sum of twelve dollars for each game assigned to him, 
which for any reason he shall have failed to umpire. 

(5.) It shall be the duty of each League club to accept as Um- 
pire for any championship game such League Umpire or substi- 
tute as the Secretary shall assign to such game, and only in the 
event of the failure of the League Umpire or substitute so as- 
signed to appear at the hour appointed for the beginning of such 
game, shall the duty devolve upon the visiting club to designate 
an Umpire for such game. 

(6.) Any League Umpire shall be subject to removal by the 
Secretary at any time, and in the event of the resignation, removal 
or expulsion of any League Umpire the Secretary shall have power 
to appoint a suitable person to fill the vacancy thus created. 

Sec. 42. Any League Umpire who shall in the judgment 0/ the 
President of the League be guilty of ungentlemanly conduct, or of 
selling, or offering to sell, a game of which he is Umpire, shall 
thereupon be removed from his official capacity, and placed under 
the same disabilities inflicted upon expelled players by the Consti- 
tution of the League. 

Sec. 43. The Umpire's Jurisdictions and Powers, in addition 
to those specified in the preceding Rules, are: 

(1.) The gentleman selected to fill the position of Umpire must 
keep constantly in mind the fact that upon his sound discretion 
and promptness in conducting the game, compelling players to ob- 
serve the spirit as well as the letter of the Rules, and enforcing 
each and every one of the Rules, largely depends the merit of the 
game as an exhibition, and the satisfaction of spectators therewith. 
He must make his decisions distinct and clear, remembering that 
every spectator is anxious to hear such decision. He must keep 
the contesting nines playing constantly from the commencement 
of the game to its termination, allowing such delays only as are 
rendered unavoidable by accident, injury or rain. He must, until 
the completion of the game, require the players of each side to 
promptly take their positions in the field as soon as the third hand 
is put out, and must require the first striker of the opposite side 
to be in his position at the bat as soon as the fielders are in their 
places. 

(2.) The players of the side "at bat" must occupy the portion 
of the field allotted them, subject to the condition that they must 
speedily vacate any portion thereof that may be in the way of the 
ball, or any fielder attempting to catch or field it. The triangular 
space behind the Home Base is reserved for the exclusive use of 
the'Umpire, Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must prohibit 



18 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



any player of the side "at bat" from crossing the same at any 
time while the ball is in the hands of the Pitcher or Catcher, or is 
passing between them, while standing in their positions. 

(3.) Section 9 of the League Constitution makes the League 
Umpire a member of the League. During the progress of a 
game he is the sole representative of the League, to see that the 
game is played and determined solely on its merits, and these 
Rules invest him with ample powers to accomplish this purpose. 
In the performance of his duties he must remember that his sole 
allegiance is due to the League. 

(4.) The Umpire is master of the field from the commencement 
to the termination of the game, and must compel the players to 
observe the provisions of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby 
invested with authority to order any player to do or omit to do 
any act, as he may deem it necessary to give force and effect to 
any and all of such provisions, and power to inflict upon any 
player disobeying any such order a fine of not less than five nor 
more than fifty dollars for each offense, and to impose a similar 
fine upon any player who shall use abusive, threatening or im- 
proper language to the Umpire, audience, or other player, and 
when the Umpire shall have so punished the player, he shall not 
have the power to revoke or remit the penalty so inflicted. (See 
League Contract, paragraph 11.) 

(5.) The Umpire shall at once notify the Captain of the offend- 
ing player's side of the infliction of any fine herein provided for, 
and the club to which such player belongs shall, upon receipt of a 
notice of said fine from the Secretary of the League, within ten 
days transmit the amount of such fine to the Secretary of the 
League. 

(6.) In case the Umpire imposes a fine on a player, or declares 
a game forfeited, he shall transmit a written notice thereof to the 
Secretary of the League within twenty-four hours thereafter ; and 
if he shall fail to do so, he shall forfeit his position as League 
Umpire, and shall forever thereafter be ineligible to umpire any 
League game. 

DISPUTES AND COMPLAINTS. 

Sec. 44. The Board of Directors shall be the sole tribunal to 
determine disputes between clubs ; the facts to be submitted, and 
the dispute adjudicated under such regulations as the Board shall 
prescribe in each case. The finding of the Board shall be final, 
and under no circumstances shall be reconsidered, re-opened, or 
inquired into, either by the League or any subsequent Board. 

Sec. 45. The Board shall at once consider any complaint pre- 
ferred by a club against a manager or player of another club (prior 
to the expiration of the championship season) for conduct in vio- 






LEAGUE CONSTITUTION'. 



19 



lation of any proidsion of this Constitution, or prejudicial to the 
good repiite of the game of base ball, and shall have power to 
require the club to which such manager or player may belong, to 
discipline him, and upon repetition of such offence, to expel him : 
Provided, That such complaint be preferred in writing, giving 
such particulars as may enable the Board to ascertain all the facts, 
and be transmitted to the Secretary, by whom it shall at once be 
referred to the Board. 

Sec. 46. In case a player under reserve for the ensuing season 
by any League club, shall prefer a complaint in writing to the 
Secretary of the League, against said club, alleging : 

1. That such club is in arrears to him on account of his con- 
tract for the current season, or 

2. That he has offered to enter into contract with such club for 
the ensuing season at a compensation of one thousand dollars foi 
seven months' service, but that the said club has declined either t<» 
enter into such contract, or to release him from reservation, the 
Secretary shall at once transmit to the said club a copy of such 
complaint, and require an answer thereto. On receipt of such an- 
swer, or if one week shall have elapsed without the receipt of an 
answer, the Secretary shall refer the papers in the case to the 
Chairman of the Board. The Board shall thereupon try the case! 
under such regulations as they may prescribe, and should they find: 
the player's complaints sustained by the facts, they shall release 
the player from reservation, and instruct the Secretary of tin- 
League to issue notice of such release, in like manner as if tin 
player had been voluntarily released by the club. The Board, 
shall also, should they find the club in arrears to the player, re- 
quire the club, under penalty of forfeiture of its membership, to* 
pay to the player, within ten days, the full amount ascertained to 
be due him. 

Sec. 47. In case a player under contract with a League club 
shall prefer a complaint in writing to the Secretary of the League, 
against such club, alleging that such club is in arrears to him on 
account of such contract, the Secretary shall act in the matter as 
provided in the preceding Section, and should the Board find the 
player's complaint sustained, they shall require the club, under 
penalty of forfeiture of its membership, to pay to the player with- 
in ten days, the full amount ascertained to be due him : Provided, 
T hat should the player refuse to serve the club, pending action by 
the Board on his complaint, he will thereby forfeit the benefits of 
the award, and in such case the Board shall revoke his award. 
_ Sec. 48. The Board shall also be the sole tribunal for the hear- 
ing of an appeal made by any person who shall have been expelled 
or suspended by his club. The matter shall be proceeded with in 
the following manner : Such person shall, within thirty days after 



20 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



the date of the expulsion or suspension, file with the Secretary a 
written statement of his defence, accompanied by a request that 
an appeal be allowed him. The Secretary shall notify the club of 
the request for an appeal, accompanying such notice with a copy 
of the appeal, and at the next annual meeting, the club, by its 
duly authorized representative, and the appellant in person, by 
attorney, or by written statement, shall appear before the lioard 
with their testimony. The Board shall impartially hear the mat- 
ter and render their decision, which shall be final, and forever 
binding on both club and player. 

Sec. 49. No Director shall sit in the trial of a cause in which 
his club is interested. 

Sec. 50. Any expenses of trials or arbitrations shall be borne 
equally by the parties to the controversy. 

Sec. 51. In all disputes, complaints or questions arising under 
"The National Agreement of Professional 13. B. Associations," 
between this League and any other association of clubs, party to 
such agreement, or between any club of this League and any club 
of any other association, party to such agreement, the adjudica- 
tion thereof shall be left entirely to the joint Board of Arbitration 
provided for by such agreement, and this League will comply 
with and be bound by the award, findings or verdict of such 
Board in any such case, so long as this League continues a party to 
such " National Agreement." 

Sec. 52. The League, at its annual meeting, shall adopt a 
code of Playing Rules, which shall continue in force subject only 
to such alterations or amendments as may be made by the joint 
committee on National Playing Rules. 

championship. 

Sec. 53. The Championship of the United States, established 
by this League, shall be contended for yearly by the clubs compos- 
ing this League. 

Sec. 54. The championship season shall extend from such date 
in April or May to such date in September or October as the 
League may determine at its stated or special meeting. 

Sec. 55. Every game played between two clubs from the com- 
mencement of the championship season to the completion of the 
championship series between such clubs, shall be a game for the 
championship, and no League club shall lend or exchange players, 
to or with each other, for any game played during the champion- 
ship season. 

Sec. 56. Each club shall play eighteen championship games 
(and no more) with every other club. Provided, however, That if 
any game be prevented by rain, or if a tie or drawn game be 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION". 



21 



played, the visiting club shall play off such tie or drawn game or 
games prevented by rain, on the first succeeding day (not count- 
ing Sundays, days previously agreed upon for championship 
games between said clubs, or days when rain renders playing im- 
possible) within the dates of the same schedule series between 
such clubs, if any remain open; and if not, such game may be 
played off on any open date between any two series on the same 
grounds: Provided, That if such a game be due on the comple- 
tion of the first schedule series between two clubs, and be not 
played off until the next schedule series between such clubs on 
the same grounds, it shall be played off on the first open date of 
such series, if there be any. 

Sec. 57. Each club shall have half of the championship series 
of games with every other club played on its own grounds; and in 
all the details of such games that do not involve the rights of the 
visiting club under the Playing Rules, but relate solely to such 
games as attractive exhibitions to the patrons of the home club, 
and the visiting club shall furnish to a person designated by the 
home club the batting order of its nine by 10 o'clock on the morn- 
ing of the day of each game. In case of the failure of any visit- 
ing club to furnish the batting order of its nine as herein 
stipulated, it shall forfeit the sum of $10, which amount shall be 
immediately transmitted to the Secretary of the League upon the 
receipt of notice from him of the infliction of such fine, which 
notice shall be given by the Secretary upon receipt of complaint 
from the home club. 

It shall be the duty of the home club to furnish the manager 
and captain of the visiting club with a list of the batting order 
before the commencement of the game. The visiting club shall 
have the right to practice its nine on the grounds of the home 
club between II and 12 o'clock A. M. on each day of its visit 
during the championship season. 

Sec. 58. All championship games shall be arranged for in writ- 
ing, and so as to complete the championship series by the expira- 
tion of the championship season. Such written arrangement 
shall be made by such method as the League shall direct, before 
the beginning of the championship season, and shall consist of a 
schedule and agreement relating thereto, which agreement shall 
be signed by every League club, and the schedule and agreement 
filed with the Secretary of the League, and a copy thereof, bearing 
his certificate as to its correctness, furnished by the Secretary to 
every League club. The schedule shall provide for an equal 
number of return games, and specify the date of each game, and 
the dates of each series of games. No date in said schedule shall 
subsequently be changed, except (1) by written agreement of two 
clubs, from a date fixed by the schedule for a game between such 
clubs to another day between the first and last date of the same 



22 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



schedule series between such clubs; or (2) as provided in Section 
551 or (3) u y the written consent of all the League clubs. 

Sec. 59. The price of admission to championship games shall 
be fifty cents for each adult person, except in cities occupied by a 
National League and American Association club. 

Sec. 60. In correspondence between clubs, all letters and tele- 
grams concerning umpires, dates, and other matters pertaining to 
championship games, to a club at home, must be addressed to 
and answered by its President, or by an officer of such club desig- 
nated by its President to act for him in such matters, the Secretary 
of the League to be notified of such designation. If such com- 
munication be made by another club when at home, they must be 
addressed by, and answered to its President or his representative, 
as above provided; and if the corresponding club be absent from 
home, they must be addressed by and answered to its manager. 

Sec. 61. Each club shall have exclusive control of its own 
ground, and shall be entitled to all receipts, from whatever 
sources, upon said ground; but the home club shall, except on 
holidays, pay to the visiting club the sum of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars for each championship game played by it on 
said ground. On national or State holidays, in lieu of such pay- 
ment, the home club shall pay to the visiting club fifty per centum 
of the receipts for general admission, at the close of each cham- 
pionship game. 

Sec. 62. No game shall be played between League clubs before 
the commencement of the championship series. 

Sec. 63. No game shall be played between any League club 
and any non-League club, or picked nine, upon the grounds of 
any League club, from the commencement to the completion of 
the championship series upon such grounds, except that any extra 
players of the home club may so play while the home club is 
absent from the city. No game shall be arranged or played be- 
tween any League and non-League clubs, or picked nines, for or 
upon any "off days" of the championship series, except as above 
provided, and upon the following express conditions: 

1. If a League championship game be prevented by rain or un- 
avoidable accident on the day (not counting Sunday) preceding 
the day agreed upon for such non-League or picked-nine game, 
then the latter shall be declared off, so as to allow the League 
clubs to play the championship game on that day. 

2. All such games shall be played under such rules, with such 
ball and such umpire, as may be mutually agreed upon by the 
League club and the non-League club. 

3. In the event of game stopped by rain before completion of 
third innings, the home club may issue rain-checks good for ad- 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



23 



mission to the next succeeding game. The uncompleted game 
shall be considered a postponed game, and no money paid to 
the visiting club. 

4. The non-League club shall, unless otherwise agreed by- 
letter, telegram or other writing, pay the League club immediately 
upon the termination of play, without reference to the number of 
innings played, the sum of one hundred dollars or one-half the 
gross receipts of such game, in case the gross receipts shall exceed 
two hundred dollars; and it is to be distinctly understood that the 
" gross receipts " include all revenue derived from the exhibition, 
whether taken at regular or carriage gates, or for admission to 
grounds, grand stands, or to other special privileges of the 
grounds; also that the visiting club shall have sole control of all 
gates, and of all entrances to grand stands, or other special 
ground privileges for which extra fees are charged. And the 
non-League club shall pay the League club fifty dollars in every 
case where a League club shall present its nine in the city or 
town of such non-League club, prepared to play at the time ap- 
pointed for such game, and the game be prevented by rain, or by 
any cause other than the refusal by such League club to play such 
game. In the event of the refusal or failure of any non-League 
club to pay the sum or sums due, as stipulated, the League club shall 
at once telegraph such fact to the Secretary of the League, who 
shall forthwith notify all other League clubs by telegraph; and no 
League club shall thereafter play such defaulting club until the 
full amount due be paid the League club, which League club 
shall, in case of such payment, notify the Secretary, and he the 
other League clubs, by telegraph. 

5. In any case not covered by the first condition specified in 
this section, a League club having agreed to play a non-League 
club upon the grounds of the latter, and failing to present its 
nine in the city or town of such non-League club, prepared to 
play at the time appointed for such game, the League club shall 
pay the non-League club the sum of fifty dollars, or such other 
sum as may have been mutually agreed upon, as the penalty of 
such default. 

Sec. 64. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games — to count 
in its series as games won by a score of nine runs to none — in 
cases where the umpire in any championship game shall award the 
game to such club on account of the violation by the contesting 
club of any playing rule of this League; and in the event of said 
forfeiture being caused by the withdrawal of the players during 
the progress of the game, then the club so withdrawing its players 
shall incur a penalty of three hundred dollars, which shall be 
payable to the Secretary of the League within ten days thereafter. 

Sec. 65. Drawn, tie, and postponed games shall not count in 



24 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



the series as games (but any games of not less than five innings 
shall be included in the averages), but must be played off, if 
possible, as provided in Section 56. If they cannot be played off 
as therein provided, they may subsequently be played off, if 
sufficient time exists before the close of the season. 

SEC. 66. The club which shall have won the greatest percentage 
of games in the championship series shall be declared the cham- 
pion club of the United States for the season in which such 
games were played. In the event that two or more clubs shall 
have won the same percentage of games, then the Board shall at 
once arrange a special series of three games between any two of 
such clubs, such games to be played in the month of October, 
and the games so played shall be included in the championship 
record, and counted in determining the award of the champion- 
ship. In such case only the provisions of this Constitution pro- 
hibiting the playing or recording as Championship games, games 
played after the expiration of the championship season, shall have 
no effect. 

The emblem of the championship shall be a pennant (of the 
national colors) to cost not less than one hundred dollars (.$100). 
It shall be inscribed with the motto, " Champion Base Ball Club 
of the United States," with the name of the club and the year in 
which the title was won, and the champion club shall be entitled 
to fly the pennant until the close of the ensuing season. 

Sec. 67. The championship shall be decided in the following 
manner: 

Within twenty-four hours after every match game played for the 
championship, the home club shall prepare and forward to the 
Secretary of the League a statement containing the full score of 
the game, according to the system specified in the "Playing 
Rules," the date, place where played, and names of the clubs and 
umpire: Provided, that no tie or drawn game shall be considered 
"a game" for any purpose except the averages; and provided 
further that in any case where the Secretary shall not receive the 
score of a championship game within five days after the playing 
of such game, the club whose duty it is to forward such score 
shall pay to the League the sum of ten dollars as the penalty of 
such default. 

At the close of the season the Secretary shall prepare a tabular 
statement of the games won and lost by each club, according to 
the statements so sent him (which statements shall be the sole 
evidence in the matter), and submit the same, with the statements 
so sent him, to the Board, who shall make the award in writing, 
and report the same to the League at its annual meeting. In 
making the award the Board shall consider: 

1. The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

2. Forfeited games. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



25 



3. Games participated in by clubs which have withdrawn, dis- 
banded, or forfeited their membership without completing their 
championship series with all other League clubs; such games 
shall be counted to the following extent: The Board shall ascer- 
tain the least number of championship games played by such club 
with any club remaining in the League, and shall, from the first 
game participated in during the championship season by such re- 
tired club, count in the series of each League club a similar num- 
ber of games, and all other games participated in by such retired 
club shall not be counted in the championship series. Provided, 
That if such retired club shall have failed to play at least one cham- 
pionship game with every League club, all games participated in 
by it shall be thrown out entirely. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

SEC. 68. The annual meeting of the League shall be held on 
the third Wednesday in November of each year, at twelve o'clock 
noon, and at such places as shall have been determined by a vote 
at the previous annual meeting. 

Sec. 69. At such meeting each club shall be represented, and 
shall be entitled to two representatives, and to have, in addition 
thereto, any of its officers or ex-officers present at such meet- 
ing; but no club shall be permitted to send as a representa- 
tive any person under contract or engagement as a ball player or 
manager, and belonging to the nine of such club in said capacity; 
they shall present a certificate from the President or Secretary of 
their club, showing their authority to act; but no club shall have 
more than one vote. 

Sec. 70. Special meetings may be called by the President of 
the League on his own option, or on the written call of four 
clubs. 

Sec. 71, A representation of a majority of clubs shall constitute 
a quorum for the transaction of business, but a less number may 
adjourn from time to time until a quorum is obtained. 

Sec. 72. The following shall be the order of business: 

1. Reading minutes of last meeting. 

2. Report of Board of Directors. 

3. Reports of special committees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Amendment of Constitution. 

6. Amendment of Playing Rules. 

7. Election of officers. 

8. Miscellaneous business. 

9. Adjournment. 



26 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



AMENDMENTS. 

Sec. 73. (1) The Constitution of this League may be altered 
or amended by a two-thirds vote of the League at any annual 
meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any other time. 

(2) Any Section of this Constitution may be suspended or its 
provisions made non-applicable by unanimous vote at a League 
meeting. 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT 

OF 

Professional Base Ball Associations. 



THIS AGREEMENT, made between the Association known 
and designated as the National League of Professional Base Ball 
Clubs of the one part, and the Association known and designated 
as the American Association of Base Ball Clubs, of the other part, 
witnesseth, that : 

First. This document shall be entitled the National Agree- 
ment, and shall supersede and be a substitute for all other agree- 
ments, similarly or otherwise designated, heretofore existing 
between the parties hereto. 

SECOND (a). No contract shall be made for the services of any 
player by any Club member of either party hereto for a longer period 
than seven months, beginning April 1st, and terminating October 
31st, and no such contract for services to be rendered after the ex- 
piration of the current year shall be made prior to the 20th day of 
October of such year, nor shall any flayer enter into any negotia- 
tion or contract with any Club, Club agent or individual for serv- 
ices to be rendered in an ensuing year prior to the said 20th day of 
October. Upon -written froojs oj a violation of this section the 
Board of Arbitration shall disqualify such flayer for and during 
said ensuing year, and shall inflict a fine of five hundred dollars 
— payable forth-with into the treasury of the Board — ufon the Club 
in whose interest such negotiation or contract -was entered into. 

(b.) Every regular contract shall be forwarded within ten days 
after its execution to the Secretary of the Association of which the 
contracting Club is a member, for registry and approval, who shall 
forthwith notify the Secretary of the other Association party hereto, 
and the other Club members of his Association. 

Third. When a player under contract -with or reservation by 
any Club member of either Association party hereto is expelled, 
blacklisted or suspended in accordance with its rules, notice of 
such disqualification shall be served upon the Secretary of the 
other Association party hereto, by the Secretary of the Association 
from whose Club such player shall have been thus disqualified and 

(27) 



28 



THE NATIONAL AGREEMENT . 



the Secretary of the other Association, shall forthwith serve notice 
of such disqualification upon the Club members of such other 
Association, and from the receipt of such notice all Club members 
of the parties hereto shall be debarred from employing or playing 
with, or against, such disqualified player, until the period of dis- 
qualification shall have terminated, or the disqualification be re- 
voked by the Association from which such player was disqualified, 
and due notice of such revocation served upon the Secretary of 
the other Association, and by him upon his respective Clubs. 

Fourth. On the tenth day of October in each year the Secretary 
oj each Association shall transmit to the Secretary of the other Asso- 
ciations a reserve list of flayers, not exceeding fourteen in number, 
then tinder contract "with its several Club members, and of such 
flayers reserved in any prior annual reserve list mho have refused 
to contract -with said Club members, and such flayers, together 
with all others thereafter to be regularly contracted with by such 
Club members, are and shall be ineligible to contract with any Club 
member of the other Association, except as hereinajter prescribed. 

Fifth. Upon the release of a player from contract or reservation 
with any club member of either Association party hereto, the serv- 
ices of such player shall at once be subject to the acceptance of 
the other Clubs of such Association, expressed in writing or by 
telegraph, to the Secretary thereof for a period of ten days after 
notice of said release, and thereafter if said services be not so ac- 
cepted, said player may negotiate and contract with any other 
Club. The Secretary of such Association shall send notice 
to the Secretary of the other Association of said player's release 
on the date thereof, and of said acceptance of his services at or 
before the expiration of the said ten days aforesaid. 

Sixth. No Club not a member of either Association party hereto* 
shall be entitled to membership in either Association party hereto 
from any city or town in which any club member of either Asso- 
ciation party hereto is located. Provided that nothing herein con- 
tained shall prohibit any club member of either Association party 
hereto from resigning its membership in such Association during 
the month of November in any year, and being admitted to mem- 
bership in the other Association, with all rights and privileges 
conferred by this agreement. 

Seventh. No game shall be played between any Club member 
of either Association party hereto and any other Club that presents 
in its nine any player rendered ineligible by this agreement. Pro- 
vided that in case the Club employing such ineligible player shall 
discharge him from its service. Clubs of the Associations parties 
hereto may thereafter play against such Club. 

Eighth. No Club shall pay to any of its players for one season's 
services a salary in excess of two thousand dollars ; nor shall any 



1 



THB NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



29 



Club employing a player for any portion of the season pay said 
player for his services at a rate in excess of said maximum of sal- 
ary, nor advance payment for such services prior to the first day 
of April in any year, except a sum of money in the month of 
March sufficient to pay for the transportation of such player from 
his domicile to the city where such Club is located. Provided 
that any player to whom the provisions of this agreement applies 
whose services are required by any Club member of the Associa- 
tions parties hereto, shall be entitled to receive for his services at 
least one thousand dollars. 

Ninth. A Board of Arbitration, consisting of three duly accred- 
ited representatives from each of the Associations parties hereto, 
shall convene annually, at a place mutually to be arranged and shall 
organize by the election of a chairman, secretary and such other 
officers and committees as to them shall seem meet and proper. 
They may make, and from time to time revoke, alter and repeal 
all necessary rules and regulations not inconsistent with this agree- 
ment, or with the constitution of either Association for their meet- 
ings, procedure, and the general transaction of their business. 
Their membership on said Board shall be determinable at the 
pleasure of their respective appointing Associations upon duly 
certified notice thereof. A quorum shall consist of at least two 
representatives from each Association, and all questions shall be 
voted upon separately by the respective delegations, and no such 
changes or additions shall be made unless concurred in by a ma- 
jority of the delegates of each Association. 

Tenth. In addition to all matters that may be specially referred 
to them by both of the Associations parties hereto, the said Board 
shall have sole, exclusive and final jurisdiction of all disputes and 
complaints arising under, and all interpretations of this Agree- 
ment. They shall also, in the interests of harmony and peace, 
arbitrate upon and decide all differences and disputes arising be- 
tween the Associations parties hereto and between a Club member 
of one and a Club member of the other Association party hereto. 
Provided, that nothing in this Agreement shall be construed as 
giving authority to said Board to pass upon, alter, amend or mod- 
ify any section or part of section of the constitution of either 
Association party hereto. 

We hereby certify that the said Associations parties hereto have 
by a unanimous vote of the Clubs of said Associations, adopted, 
ratified and approved this Agreement. 

N. E. Young, 
President of The National League of Professional B. B. Clubs. 

W. C. Wikoff, 
President of The American Association of B. B. Clubs. 

February I, 1887. 



ARTICLES OF QUALIFIED ADMISSION 

TO THE 

NATIONAL AGREEMENT 

OF 

Professional Dase Dall Associations. 



The parties of the first part being the parties to the National 
Agreement of Professional Base Ball Associations (viz. : The Na- 
tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs and the American 
Association of Base Ball Clubs), and the parties of the second 
part being such eligible professional or semi-professional associa- 
tions of base ball clubs as shall duly authorize their Presidents to 
sign this agreement, and whose Presidents do sign this Agreement 
in pursuance to said authority, do hereby agree each with the 
other, in consideration of the mutual advantages and protections 
to be derived therefrom, as follows: 

I. Each Association constituting one of the parties of the second 
part, when it shall have signed this Agreement in pursuance to 
authority given its President in accordance with the provisions 
herein, shall be, and each of them is, hereby given and afforded 
the following protection and qualified admission to the National 
Agreement of Professional Base Ball Associations, and this in 
lieu of all previous contracts made by the parties to the National 
Agreement of Professional Base Ball Associations with the said 
parties of the second part, or any of them. 

II. On or after the twentieth day of October of each year the 
Secretary of each Association which is a party of the second part, 
shall forward to the Secretary of each Association party of the 
first part, the names of any and all players then under contract 
who have signed such contracts on or after the twentieth day of 
October, with any of the Clubs, members of the said Associat ons 
parties of the second part, and from and after the receipt of such 
notice and of notice of all subsequent contracts from said Secre- 
taries, any and all players so reported as being under contract with 

(30) 



ARTICLES OF QUALIFIED ADMISSION. 



31 



any of the Clubs, members of the Association parties of the 
second part, shall be ineligible to contract with any Club member 
of the parties of tlie first or second part until the 20th day of 
October then next ensuing, unless such Club member shall have 
previously disbanded or lost its membership in its Association. 

III. Any player who has entered into a contract with any Club 
member of any Association party of the second part may be sus- 
pended without pay by such Club or Association for breach of con- 
tract or breach of any of the rules of such Association, and he 
shall thereafter be ineligible to sign or play during the remainder 
of the current season with any of the Clubs of the Associations 
parties to or under the protection of the National Agreement un- 
less such disability shall have been sooner removed by the Club or 
Association by -which he -was suspended. 

IV. Any player under contractor reservation, or who shall be 
expelled, blacklisted or suspended by either of the parties of the 
first part shall be ineligible to sign or play with any of the Clubs, 
members of the Association's parties of the second part herein, 
and any Club who shall knowingly play any such player, either 
in their Club, or who shall play against any other Club who has 
such a player in their nine, shall be dismissed from membership 
by the Association of which it is a member, or said Association 
shall forfeit all rights under this Agreement. 

V. Before any Club member of any Association, a party of the 
second part, ; hall contract with a player for an ensuing season, 
the party of the second part if which such Club is or may be a 
member, shall enact laws or regulations debarring such Club from 
enteringinto such contract with such player while under arrears to 
him on account of his contract for the current season; also debar- 
ring such Club from suspending or otherwise attempting to dis- 
qualify a player for refusing to contract with it. Kach Associa- 
tion party of the second part shall also, at its next legislative meet- 
ing, enact laws providing for the expulsion of any Club member 
for refusal to pay arrears of salary to a player when thereto 
required by the Board < f Directors of said Association, party of 
the second part, or said Association shall forfeit all rights under 
this Agreement. 

VI. Qualified membership of any of the parties of the second 
part shall be forfeited for jailing to expel any of its Club members 
that may play a game of ball except under the joint playing rules 
adopted by the parties of the first part, or that may play a game in 
any city, or -within jour miles thereof, -wh'rein is located a Club 
member oj the parties of the first part, -without the consent of said 
Club, on the same day on -which a championship game is sched- 
uled. 



32 



ARTICLES OF QUALIFIED ADMISSION. 



VII. In lieu of active membership in the Board of Arbitration 
it is expressly stipulated that in ; ny case coming b fore the said 
Board involving the forfeiture of any rights o- p ivileges of any 
Association party of the second pait, or any Club member thereof, 
the Secretary of the said Board shall notify such Association in 
writing, and on demand of said par y of the second part said 
Board shall grant it a hearing on the trial of the case, ad no ad- 
verse verdict shall be rendered by said Board against such Asso- 
ciation party of the second part, nor against any Club member 
thereof, unless such notice be furnished, and such hearing, if 
thereupon demanded, granted. 

VIII. It is understood and agreed by and between the parties 
hereto, that any controversy between Associations, or between 
Clubs of different Associations parties to this Agreement, as to 
any matter or matters herein mentioned, or mentioned in the Na- 
tional Agreement, shall be determined by the Board of Arbitra- 
tion without regard to any law or regulation of any party hereto, 
that may be in conflict therewith. 

IX. Each Association parties of the second part, shall pay to 
the Secretary of the Board of Arbitration as annual dues the sum 
of $50, on or before the first day of February in each year dur- 
ing their qualified membership under this agreement. 

X. All contracts or agreements heretofore made between the 
parties hereto are hereby declared null and void. 



izlstidieix: 



-TO 



RULES AND REGULATIONS- 



RULE. 

The Ground I 

The Infield 2 

The Bases 3 

The Foul Lines 4. 

The Pitcher's Lines 5 

The Catcher's Lines 6 

The Captain's Lines 7 

The Players' Lines 8 

The Players' Bench 9 

The Batsman's Lines 10 

The Three Feet Lines 11 

The Lines Must be Marked 12 

The Ball 13 

Weight and size (1) 13 

Furnished by Home Club (2) 13 

Replaced if Injured (3) 13 

The Bat 14 

FIELD RULES. 

Open Betting and Pool Selling Prohibited 15 

No Person Allowed on Field during Game 16 

Players not to Sit with Spectators 17 

Penalty for Insulting Umpire > B 

Penalty for not Keeping Field Clear 

Restriction as to Addressing Audience 20 

Number of Players in the Field 21 

(88) 



34 



INDEX TO PLAYING HULES. 



THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

RULE. 

Positions 22 

Players' Positions 23 

in the Field (1) 23 

at the Bat (2) 23 

Order of Batting (3) 23 

Restriction as to Occupying Catcher's Lines (4) 23 

DEFINITIONS. 

A Fair Ball 23 

An Unfair Ball 24 

A Balk 25 

A Dead Ball 26 

A Block 27 

A Fair Hit 28 

A Foul Hit 29 

A Ball Passing Outside Grounds 30 

A Strike 31 

A Foul Strike 32 

"Play" 33 

' ' Time " 34 

"Game" 3.5 

An Inning 36 

A Time at Bat 37 

Legal or Legally 38 

THE GAME. 

Number of Innings 39 

Drawn Game 40 

Forfeited Game 41 

" No Game" 42 

Substitute, when Allowed 43 

Choice of First Innings 44 

When Umpire Must Call " Play" ; Umpire Call Balls 45 

Game Must Begin when " Play" is Called 46 

When Umpire May Suspend Play 46 

" " Terminate Game .... 46 

Rain, Effect of, in Terminating Game 46 

" •* " " 46 

" " " " " 46 

" Definition of (4) 46 

" Umpire's Duty in Case of 46 

Batsman Must Call for Ball He Wants 46 



1 



INDEX TO PLAYING ai/lLJttS. 



85 



RULE. 

What Umpire Must Count and Call 46 

When Batsman is Out 47 

' ' Becomes Base Runner 48 

Base Runner 'Must Touch Bases in Order 49 

When Entitled to Hold Base 49 

" Take one Base 50 

' ' Required to Return to Base 51 

No Substitute Allowed for Base Runner 52 

When Base Runner is Out 53 

When Umpire Shall, without Appeal, Declare Player "Out" 54 

When Ball is not in Play until Returned to Pitcher 55 

Block, Effect of 56 

Run, when to be Scored 57 

Captain only to Address Umpire 58 

Coaching Restrictions 59 

Umpire's Duties 60 

Fines by Umpire 61 

Reversing Decision 62 

THE UMPIRE. 

Changing Umpire 60 

Duties as to Materials of Game 65 

" Ground Rules 65 

' ' Reversal of Decision 65 

Changing Umpire during Game 65 

Expulsion of Umpire 65 

Umpire's Jurisdiction and Powers 65 

Umpire to Give Notice of Fine 65 

Forfeited Game 65 

Special Penalties 65 

Scoring Regulations 66 

CONSTRUCTION AND AMENDMENTS. 

Amendment of Rules 67 



— THE — 

NATIONAL PLAYING RULES 



Professional Base Ball Clubs 

AS RECOMMENDED BY THE CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 
MEETING IN CHICAGO, NOVEMBER, lS86, AND FOR- 
MALLY ADOPTED BY THE NATIONAL LEAGUE AND 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION AT THEIR RESPECTIVE 
CONVENTIONS IN NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER, l8S6. 



THE MATERIALS OF THE GAME. 

Rule I. The Ground must be an inclosed field, sufficient in 
size to enable each player to play in his position as required by 
these Rules. 

Rule 2. The Infield must be a space of ground thirty yards 
square. 

Rule 3. The Bases must be 

(1) Four in number, and designated as First Base, Second 
Base, Third Base and Home Base. 

(2) The Home Base must be of whitened rubber twelve inches 
square, so fixed in the ground as to be even with the surface, and 
so placed in the corner of the infield that two of its sides will form 
part of the boundaries of said infield. 

(3) The First, Second and Third Bases must be canvas bags, 
fifteen inches square, painted white, and filled with some soft ma- 
terial, and so placed that the center of the second base shall be up- 
on its corner of the infield, and the center of the first and third 
bases shall be on the lines running to and from second base and seven 
and one-half inches from the foul lines, providing that each base 
shall be entirely within the foul lines. 

(4) All the Bases must be securely fastened in their positions, 
and so placed as to be distinctly seen by the Umpire. 

Rule 4. The foul Lines must be drawn in straight lines from 
the outer corner of the Home Base, along the outer edge of the 
First and Third Bases, to the boundaries of the Ground. 

(30) 



PLAYING RULES. 



37 



Rule 5 (Sec. i). The Pitchers Lines must be straight lines 
forming the boundaries of a space of ground, in the infield, five 
and one-half feet long by four feet wide, distant fifty feet fiom 
the center of the Home Base, and so placed that the five and one- 
half feet lines would each be two feet distant from and parallel 
with a straight line passing through the center of the Home and 
Second Bases. Each corner of this space must be marked by a 
flat iron plate or stone, six inches square, fixed in the ground, 
even with the surface. 

(Sec. 2.) The pitcher shall take his position facing the batsman, 
■with both feet squarely on the ground, the right foot on the rear 
line of the "box," his left foot in advance of the right, and to the 
left of an imaginary line from his right foot to the center of the 
home base. He shall not raise his right foot, unless in the act of 
delirei ing the ball, nor make more than one step in such delivery. 
He shall hold the ball, before de lively, fairly in ft ont of his body, 
and in sight of the Umpire. In the case of a left-handed pitcher 
the above words "left" and "right" are to be reversed. When the 
pitcher feigns to throw the ball to a base he must resume the above 
position and pause momentarily before delivering the ball to the bat. 

Rule 6. The Catcher's L ties must be drawn from the outer 
corner of the Home Base, in continuation of the Foul Lines, 
straight to the limits of the Ground back of the Home Base. 

Rule 7. The Captain's or Coacher's Lines must be a line fifteen 
feet from and parallel with the Foul Lines, said lines commencing 
at a line parallel with and seventy-file feet distant from the catch- 
er's line, and running thence to the limits of the grounds. And 
should the said Captain or Coacher 'wilfully fail to remain in said 
bounds, he shall be fined by the Umpire five dollars for each such 
offence, except upon an appeal by the Captain from the Umpire's 
decision upon a misinterpretation of the rules. 

Rule 8. The Players' Lines must be drawn from the Catcher's 
Lines to the limits of the Ground, fifty feet distant from and 
parallel with the Foul Lines. 

Rule 9. The Players' Benches must be furnished by the home 
club, and placed upon a portion of the ground outside the Players' 
Lines. They must be twelve feet in length, and must be immov- 
ably fastened to the ground. At the end of each bench must be 
immovably fixed a bat-rack, with fixtures for holding twenty bats; 
one such rack must be designated for the exclusive use of the 
Visiting Club, and the other for the exclusive use of the Home 
Club. 

Rule 10. The Batsman's Lines must be straight lines forming 
the boundaries of a space on the right, and of a similar space on 
the left of the Home Base, six feet long by four feet wide, extend- 
ing three feet in front of and three feet behind the center of the 



38 



PLAVllVG RULES 



Home Base, and with its nearest line distant six inches from the 
Home Base. 

Rule II. The Three Feet Lints must be drawn as follows: 
From a point on the Foul Line from Home Base to First Base, 
and equally distant from such bases, shall be drawn a line on Foul 
Ground, at a right angle to said Foul Line, and to a point three 
feet distant from it; thence running parallel with said Foul Line, 
to a point three feet distant from the First Base; thence in a 
straight line to the Foul Line, and thence upon the Foul Line 
to point of beginning. 

Rule 12. The lines designated in Rules 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10 and 11 
must be marked with chalk or other suitable material, so as to be 
distinctly seen by the Umpire. They must all be so marked their 
entire length, except the Captain's and Players' Lines, which must 
be so marked for a distance of at least thirty-five yards from the 
Catcher's Lines. 

Rule 13. The Ball* 

(Section i.) Must not weigh less than five nor more than five 
and one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not less than 
nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches in circumference. 
The Spalding League ball, or the Reach American Association 
ball, must be used in all games played tinder these rules. 

(Sec. 2.) For each championship game twobaVs shall be fur- 
nished by the home club to the Umpire for use. When the ball in 
play is batted over the fence or stands, on to foul gr.'und out of 
sight of the players, the other ball shall be immediately put into play 
by the Umpire. As often as one of the two in use shall be lost, 
a new one must be substituted, so that the Umpire may at all times, 
after the game begins, have two for use. The moment the Umpire 
delivers the alt-mate ball to the catcher or pitcher it comes into 
play, and shall not be exchanged until it, in turn, passes out of 
sight on to foul ground. 

(Sec. 3.) In all games the ball or balls played with shal! be 
furnished by the Home Club, and the last ball in play becomes 
the property of the winning club. Each ball to be used in 

*Tiie Spalding League Ball has been the ofHcial ball of the Na- 
tional League for the past nine years, and has again been adopted for 1887. 
It is in general use by all the leading professional, college and amateur 
clubs throughout the country, and stands without a rival as the best ball 
made. 

The Spalding Ball has been officially adopted and used exclusively by 
the following associations: 

The National League; International League; Northwestern League; 
Eastern League; Western League; New England League; N.Y. Inter-stale 
League; Canadian League; Colored league; American College Association; 
N. W. College Association, and nearly all the minor State and City leagues 
throughout the United States and Canada. Beware of counterfeits J none 
genuine without the Spalding Trade Mark on each box and ball. 



PLAYING RULES. 



80 



championship games shall be examined, measured and weighed by 
the Secretary of the Association inclosed in a paper box and 
sealed with the seal of the Secretary, which seal shall not be 
broken except by the umpire in the presence of the captains of the 
two contesting nines after play has been called. 

(Sec. 4.) Should the ball become out of shape, or cut or ripped 
so as to expose the yarn, or in any way so injured as to be — in the 
opinion of the Umpire— unfit for fair use, the Umpire, on being 
appealed to by either Captain, shall at once put the alternate ball 
into play and call for a new ball. 

Rule 14. The Bat. 

(1) Must be made wholly of wood, except that the handle may 
be wound with twine, or a granulated substance applied, not to 
exceed eighteen inches from the end. 

(2) It must be round except that a portion of the surface may 
be flat on one side, must not exceed two and one-half inches in 
diameter in the thickest part, and must not exceed forty-two inches 
in length. 

FIELD RULES. 

Rule 15. No Club shall allow open betting or pool selling up- 
on its grounds, nor in any building owned or occupied by it. 

Rule 16. No peison shall be allowed upon any part of the field 
during the progress of the game, in addition to the players in uni- 
form, the manager on each side and the umpire; except such officers 
of the law as may be present in uniform, and such officials of the 
Home Club as may be necessary to preserve the peace. 

Rule 17. Players in uniform shall not be permitted to seat 
themselves among the spectators. 

Rule 18. The Umpire is the sole judge of play, and is en- 
titled to the respect of the spectators, and any person offering any 
insult or indignity to him, must be promptly ejected from the 
grounds. 

Rule 19. Every club shall furnish sufficient police force upon 
its own grounds to preserve order, and in the event of a crowd en- 
tering the field during the progress of a game, and interfering 
with the play in any manner, the Visiting Club may refuse to play 
further until the field be cleared. If the ground be not cleared 
within fifteen minutes thereafter, the Visiting Club may claim, 
and shall be entitled to, the game by a score of nine runs to none 
(no matter what number of innings have been played). 

Rule 20. No Umpire, Manager, Captain or Player shall ad- 
dress the audience during the progress of a game, except in case 
of necessary explanation. 



40 



PLAYING RULES. 



THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Rule ai. The Players of each club in a match game shall be 
nine in number, one of whom shall act as Captain. Every club 
shall be required to adopt uniforms for its players, and in no case 
shall less than nine men be allowed to play on each side. Each 
player shall be required to present himself upon tne field during 
said game in a neat and cleanly condition, but no player shall at- 
tach anything to the sole or heel of his shoes other than the ordi- 
nary base ball shoe plate. 

Rule aa. The Player's Position shall be 

(Section i.) When in the field (designated "Fielders" in these 
Rules) such as may be assigned them by their Captain, except 
that the Pitcher must take his position within the Pitcher's Lines, 
as defined in Rule 5. 

(Sec. 2.) When their side goes to the bat they must immedi. 
ately seat themselves upon the player's bench and remain there 
until the side is put out, except when batsman or base runner 
All bats not in use must be kept in the bat racks, and the two 
players next succeeding the batsman, in the order in which they 
are named on the score, must be ready with bat in hand to 
promptly take position as batsman; provided, that the Captain 
and one assistant only may occupy the space between the play- 
ers' lines and the Captains' lines to coach base runners. 

(Sec. 3.) The Batsmen must take their positions within the 
Batsmen's Lines, as defined in Rule 10, in the order in which they 
are named on the score, which must contain the batting order of 
both nines, and must be followed, except in case of disability of a 
player, in which case the substitute must take the place of the dis- 
abled player in the batting order. 

(Sec. 4.) No player of the side at bat, except when Batsman, 
shall occupy any portion of the space within the Catcher's Lines, 
as defined in Rule 6. 



DEFINITIONS. 

Rule 33. A Fair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher while 
standing wholly within the lines of his position, and facing the 
batsman, the ball, so delivered, to pass over the home base, not 
lower than the batsman's knee, nor higher than his shoulder. 

Rule 24. An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher 
as in Rule 23, except that the ball does not pass over the Home 
Base, or does pass over the Home Base above the batsman's 
shoulder or below his knee. 

Rule 25. A Balk is 



PLAYING RULES. 



41 



(Sec. i.) Any motion made by the Pitcher to deliver the ball 
to the bat without delivering it, and shall be held to include any 
and every accustomed motion with the hands, arms or feet, or po- 
sition of the body assumed by the I'itcher in his delivery of the 
ball, and any motion calculated to deceive a base runnet, except the 
ball be accidentally dropped. 

(Sec. 2.) If the ball be held by the Pitcher so long as to delay 
the game unnecessarily ; or 

,(Sec. 3.) Any motion to deliver the ball, or the delivering 
the ball to the bat by the Pitcher when any part of his person is 
upon ground outside of the lines of his position, including all pre- 
liminary motions with the hands, arms and feet. 

Rule 26. A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by the 
Pitcher that touches the Batsman's bat without being struck at, or 
any part of the Batsman's person or clothing while standing in 
his position without being struck at ; or any part of the Umpire's 
person or clothing without first passing the Catcher. 

Rule 27. A Block is a batted or thrown ball that is stopped 
or handled by any person not engaged in the game. 

Rule 28. A Fair Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, stand- 
ing in his position, that first touches the ground, the First Base, 
the Third Base, the part of th£ person of a player, or any other 
object that is in front of or on either of the Foul Lines, or (excep- 
tion) batted directly to the ground by the Batsman, standing in 
his position, that (whether it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) 
bounds or rolls within the Foul Lines, between Home and 
First, or Home and Third Bases, without first touching the per- 
son of a player. 

Rule 29. A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, stand- 
ing in his position, that first touches the ground, the part of the 
person of a player, or any other object that is behind either of the 
Foul Lines, or that strikes the person of such Batsman, while 
standing in his position, or (exception) batted directly to the 
ground by the Batsman, standing in his position, that (whether it 
first touches Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls outside the 
Foul Lines, between Home and First, or Home and Third Bases, 
without first touching the person of a player. 

Rule 30. When a batted ball passes outside the grounds, the 
Umpire shall decide it fair should it disappear within, or foul 
should it disappear outside of the range of the Foul Lines, and 
Rules 2S and 29 are to be construed accordingly. 

Rule 31. A Strike is 

(1.) A ball struck at by the Batsman without its touching his 
bat; or, 



42 



PLAYING RULES. 



(2.) A Fair Ball, legally delivered by the Pitcher, but not struck 
at by the Batsman. 

(3.) Any obvious attempt to make a foul hit. 

Rule 32. A Foul Strike is a ball batted by the Batsman when 
any part of his person is upon ground outside the lines of the 
Batsman's position. 

Rule 33. Flay is the order of the Umpire to begin the game, 
or to resume play after its suspension. 

Rule 34. Time is the order of the Umpire to suspend play. 
Such suspension must not extend beyond the day of the game. 

Rule 35. Game is the announcement by the Umpire that the 
game is terminated. 

Rule 36. An Innings is the term at bat of the nine players 
representing a Club in a game, and is completed when three of 
such players have been put out as provided in these Rules. 

Rule 37. A Time at Bat is the term at bat of a Batsman. It 
begins when he takes his position, and continues until he is put 
out, or becomes a base runner ; except when, because of being hit 
by a pitched ball, or in case of an illegal delivery by the Pitcher, as 
in Rule 48. 

Rule 38. Legal or Legally, signifies as required by these 
Rules. 

THE GAME. 

Rule 39. A Game shall consist of nine innings to each con- 
testing nine, except that, 

(1.) If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine innings 
than the other side has scored in eight innings, the game shall 
then terminate. 

(2.) If the side last at bat in the ninth innings scores the 
winning run before the third man is out, the game shall then 
terminate. 

(3.) If the score be a tie at the end of nine innings to 
each side, play shall only be continued until the side first at bat 
shall have scored one or more runs than the other side, in an equal 
number of innings, or until the other side shall score one more 
run than the side first at bat. 

(4.) If the Umpire calls " Game " on account of darkness 
or rain at any time after five innings have been completed by 
both sides, the score shall be that of the last equal innings played 
unless the side second at bat shall have scored one or more runs 
than the side first at bat, in which case the score of the game 
shall be the total number of runs made. 

Rule 40. A Drawn Game shall be declared by the Umpire 



PLAYING RULES. 



48 



when he terminates a game on account of darkness or rain, after 
five equal innings have been played, if the score at the time is 
equal on the last even innings played ; but (exception) if the side 
that went second to bat is then at the bat, and has scored the same 
number of runs as the other side, the Umpire shall declare the 
game drawn, without regard to the score of the last equal innings. 

Rule 41. A Forfeited Game shall be declared by the Umpire 
in favor of the Club not in fault, in the following cases: 

(1.) If the nine of a club fail to appear upon the field, or 
being upon the field, fail to begin the game within five minutes 
after the Umpire has called " Play," at the hour appointed for the 
beginning of the game, unless such delay in appearing or in com- 
mencing the game be unavoidable. 

(2.) If, after the game has begun, one side refuses or 
fails to continue playing, unless such game has been suspended 
or terminated by the Umpire. 

(3.) If, after play has been suspended by the Umpire, one 
side fails to resume playing within five minutes after the Umpire 
has called " Play." 

(4.) If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one of these 
Rules is willfully violated. 

Rule 42. "No Game" shall be declared by the Umpire if he 
shall terminate play on account of rain or darkness,' before five 
innings on each side are completed. 

Rule 43. A Substitute shall not be allowed to take the place 
of any player in a game, unless such player be disabled in the 
game then being played, by reason of illness or injury, of the nat- 
ure or extent of which the Umpire shall be sole judge. 

Rule 44. The choice of innings shall be, 

(i.) Given to the Captain of the Home Club, who shall 
also be the sole judge of the fitness of the ground J or beginning a 
game after rain, and no game shall be begun later than two hours 
before sunset. 

(2.) In every championship game each team shall be re- 
quired to have present on the field, in uniform, at least one or 
more players, and no player except he be so in uniform shall be 
substituted for any sick or injured player. 

Rule 45. The Umpire must call " Play " at the hour appoint- 
ed for beginning a game. The game must begin when the Um- 
pire calls "Play." When he calls "Time," play shall be sus- 
pended until he calls " Play " again, and during the interim no 
player shall be put out, base be run, or run be scored. The Um- 
pire shall suspend play only for an accident to himself or a player 
(but in case of accident to a Fielder, Time shall not be called un- 



7 



44 



PLAYING RULES. 



til the ball be returned to, and held by the Pitcher, standing in 
his position), or in case rain falls so heavily that the spectators 
are compelled, by the severity of the storm, to seek shelter, in 
which case he shall note the time of suspension, and should such 
rain continue to fall thirty minutes thereafter, he shall terminate 
the game ; or to enforce order in case of annoyance from spectators. 
The Umpire shall also declare every "Dead Ball," " Block," 
" Foul Hit," " Foul Strike," and " Balk." 

Rule 46. The Umpire shall count and call every "unfairball" 
delivered by the Pitcher, and every "dead ball," if also an unfair 
ball, as a "ball," and he shall also count and call every "strike." 
Neither a "ball" nor a "strike" shall be counted or called until 
the ball has passed the home base. 

RULE 47. The Batsman is out: 

(Sec. 1.) If he fails to take his position at the bat in his order 
of batting, unless the error be discovered, and the proper Batsman 
takes his position before a fair hit has been made, and in such 
case the balls and strikes called will be counted in the time at bat 
of the proper Batsman. 

(2.) If he fails to take his position within one minute after 
the Umpire has called for the Batsman. 

(3.) If he makes a Foul Hit, and the ball be momentarily 
held by a Fielder before touching the ground, provided it be 
not caught in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other 
than the Fielder before being caught. 

(4.) If he.makes a Foul Strike. 

(5.) If he plainly attempts to hinder the Catcher from 
fielding the ball, evidently without effort to make a fair hit. 

(6.) If, while the First Base be occupied by a base runner, 
four strikes be called on him by the Umpire, except when two 
hands are already out. 

Rule 48. The Batsman becomes a Base Runner 

(1.) Instantly after he makes a Fair Hit. 

(2.) Instantly after five Balls have been called by the Um- 
pire. 

(3.) Instantly after four Strikes have been declared by the 
Umpire. 

(4.) If, while he be a batsman, his person or clothing be 
hit by a ball from the pitcher, unless — in the opinion of the Urn- 
fire — he intentionally permits himself to be so hit. 

(5.) Instantly after an illegal delivery of a ball by the pitcher. 

Rule 49. The Base Runner must touch each Base in regular 
order, viz: First, Second, Third and Home Bases, and when 
•obliged to return, must retouch the base or bases in reverse 



PLAYING RULES. 



45 



order. He shall only be considered as holding a base after 
touching it, and shall then be entitled to hold such base until he 
has legally touched the next base in order, or has been legally 
forced to vacate it for a succeeding Base Runner. 

Rule 50. The Base Runner shall be entitled, without being 
put out, to take one Base in the following cases: 

(1.) If, while he was batsman, the Umpire called five Balls. 

(2.) If the Umpire awards a succeeding Batsman a base 
on five balls, or for being hit with a pitched ball, or in case of an 
illegal delivery — as in rule 48 — and the Base Runner isthereby 
forced to vacate the base held by him. 

(3.) If the Umpire calls a "balk." 

(4.) If a ball delivered by the Pitcher pass the Catcher 
and touch any fence or building within ninety feet of the Home 
Base. 

(5.) If he be prevented from making a base by the ob- 
struction of an adversary. 

(6.) If the fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his hat 
or any part of his dress. 

Rule 51. The Base Runner shall return to his Base, and shall 
be entitled to so return without being put out. 

(1.) If the Umpire declares a Foul Hit, and the ball be 
not legally caught by a Fielder. 

(2.) If the Umpire declares a Foul Strike. 

(3.) If the Umpire declares a Dead Ball, unless it be also 
he fifth Unfair Ball, and he be thereby forced to take the next base, 
us provided in Rule 50. (See clause 2.) 

Rule 52. The Base Runner shall not have a substitute run 
for him. 

Rule 53. The Base Runner is out: 

(1.) If, after four strikes have been declared against him 
while Batsman, and the Catcher fails to catch the fourth-strike 
ball, he plainly attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding the 
ball. 

(2.) If, having made a Fair Hit while Batsman, such fair- 
hit ball be momentarily held by a Fielder, before touching the 
ground or any object other than a Fielder: Provided, It be not 
caught in the Fielder's hat or cap. 

r (3.) If, when the Umpire has declared four Strikes on 
him while Batsman, the fourth-strike ball be momentarily held by 
a Fielder before touching the ground: Provided, It be not 
caught in a F'ielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other than 
a Fielder before being caught. 

(4.) If, after four Strikes or a Fair Hit, he be touched 



46 



PLAYIMG RULES. 



with the ball in the hand of a Fblder before such Base Runner 
touches First Base. 

(5.) If, after four Strikes or a Fair Hit, the ball be 
securely held by a Fielder, while touching First Base with any 
part of his person, before such Base Runner touches First Base. 

(6.) If, in running the last half of the* distance from 
Home Base to First Base, he runs outside the Three Feet Lines, 
as defined in Rule 11; except that he must do so if necessary to 
avoid a Fielder attempting to field a batted ball, and in such case 
shall not be declared out. 

(7.) If, in running from First to Second Base, from Second 
to Third Base, or from Third to Home Base, he runs 
more than three feet from a direct line between such bases to 
avoid being touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder; but in 
case a Fielder be occupying the Base Runner's proper path, at- 
tempting to field a batted ball, then the Base Runner shall run 
out of the path and behind said Fielder, and shall not be declared 
out for so doing. 

(8.) If he fails to avoid a Fielder attempting to field a batted 
ball, in the manner prescribed in clauses 6 and 7 of this Rule; or 
if he, in any way, obstructs a Fielder attempting to field a batted 
ball, or intentionally interferes with a thrown hall: Provided, 
That if two or more Fielders attempt to field a batted ball, and 
the Base Runner comes in contact with one or more of them, 
the Umpire shall determine which Fielder is entitled to the benefit 
of this Rule, and shall not decide the Base Runner out for coming 
in contact with any other Fielder. 

(9.) If, at any time while the ball is in play, he be touched 
by the ball i. . the hand of a Fielder, unless some part of his per- 
son is touching a base he is entitled to occupy; provided the ball 
be held by the Fielder after touching him; but (exception as to First 
Base), in running to First Base, he may over run said base without 
being put out for being off said base after first touching it, pro- 
vided he returns at once and retouches the base, after which he 
may be put out as at any other base. If, in over-running First 
Base, he also attempts to run to Second Base, or, after passing the 
base he turns to his left from the foul line, he shall forfeit such ex- 
emption from being put out. 

(10.) If, when a Fair or Foul Hit ball is legally caught 
by a Fielder, such ball is legally held by a Fielder on the base oc- 
cupied by the Base Runner when such ball was struck (or the 
Base Runner be touched with the ball in the hands of a Fielder), 
before he retouches said base after such Fair or Foul Hit ball was 
so caught. Provided, That the Base Runner shall not be out in 
such case, if, after the ball was legally caught as above, it be 
delivered to the bat by the Pitcher before the Fielder holds it on 



PLAYING RULES. 



47 



said base, or touches the Base Runner with it; but if the Base 
Runner in attempting to reach a base, detaches it be/ore being 
touched or forced out he shall be declared safe. 

(n.) If, when a Batsman becomes a Base Runner {except 
as provided in Rule 50), the First Base, or the First and Second 
Bases, or the First, Second and Third Bases, be occupied, any 
Base Runner so occupying a base shall cease to be entitled to 
hold it, until any following Base Runner is put out, and may be 
put out at the next base or by being touched by the ball in the 
hands of a Fielder in the same manner as in running to First Base, 
at any time before any following Base Runner is put out. 

(12.) If a fair hit ball strike him he shall be declared out, 
and in such case no base shall be run unless forced by the Bats- 
man becoming a Base Runner, and no run be scored. 

(13.) If when running to a base or forced to return to a 
base, he fail to touch the intervening base or bases, if any, in the 
order prescribed in Rule 49, he may be put out at the base he 
fails to touch, or by being touched by the ball in the hand of a 
Fielder, in the same manner as in running to First Base. 

(14.) If, when the Umpire calls "Play," after any sus- 
pension of a game, he fails to return to and touch the base he oc- 
cupied when "Time" was called before touching the next base. 

Rule 54. The Umpire shall declare the Batsman or Base 
Runner out, without waiting for an appeal for such decision, in 
all cases where such player is put out in accordance with these 
rules, except as provided'in Rule 53, Clauses 10 and 14. 

Rule 55. In case of a Foul Strike, Foul Hit ball not legally 
caught flying, Dead Ball, or Base Runner put out for being struck 
by a fair-hit ball, the ball shall not be considered in play until 
it is held by the Pitcher standing in his position. 

Rule 56. Whenever a Block occurs, the Umpire shall declare 
it, and Base Runners may run the bases without being put out, 
until after the ball has been returned to and held by the Pitcher 
standing in his position. 

Rule 57. One Run shall be scored every time a Base Runner, 
after having legally touched the first three bases, shall touch the 
Home Base before three men are put out. If the third man is 
forced out, or is put out before reaching First Base, a run shall 
not be scored. 

Rule 58. The Captain only may address the Umpire, and 
then, only, upon a question of interpretation of the rules. 
Any violation of this rule shall subject the offender to a fine of 
five dollars by the Umpire. 

Rule 59. The Captains and Coachers are restricted in 
coaching to the Base Runner only, and are not allowed to ad- 



T 



48 



PLAYING RULES. 



dress any remarks except to the Base Runner, and then only in 
words of necessary direction; and no player shall use language 
which will, in any manner, refer to or reflect upon a player of 
the opposing club or the audience. To enforce the abovfc 
the Captain of the opposite side may call the attention of tht 
Umpire to the offence and upon a repetition of the same the 
club shall de debarred from further coaching during the game. 

THE UMPIRE'S DUTIES. 

Rule 60. The Umpire's duties shall be as follows: 

(l.) The Umpire is the sole and absolute judge of pis/. 
In no instance shall any person be allowed to question the cor- 
rectness of any decision made by him except the Captains of the 
contending nines, and no other player shall, at such time leave 
his position in the field, his place at the bat, on the bases or 
player's bench, to approach or address the Umpire in word or 
act upon such disputed decision, unless requested to do so by the 
Umpire. Every player violating this provision shall be fined by 
said Umpire ten dollars for each offence. Neither shall any 
Manager or other officers of either club except the Captains as 
before mentioned - be permitted to go upon the field or address 
the Umpire in regard to such disputed decision under a penalty of 
a forfeiture of the game to the opposing club. The Umpire shall 
in no case appeal to any spectator for information in regard to 
any such case, but may ask for information, if he so desires, 
from one or more of the players. 

(2.) Before the commencement of a Match Game, the Um- 
pire shall see that the rules governing all the materials of the 
game are strictly observed. He shall ask the Captain of the 
Home Club whether there are any special ground rules to be 
enforced, and if there are, he shall see that they are duly enforced, 
provided they do not conflict with any of these Rules. He shall 
also ascertain whether the fence in the rear of the Catcher's 
position is distant ninety feet from the Home Base. 

(3.) In case the Umpire imposes a fine on a player, or declares 
a game forfeited, he shall transmit a written notice thereof to the 
President of the Association within twenty-four hours thereafter, 
under the penalty of having said fine taken from his own salary. 

Rule 61. The Umpire's jurisdiction and powers in addition 
to tho;e specified in the constitution and the preceding rules are : 

(1.) He must keep the contesting nines playing con- 
stantly from the commencement of the game to its termination, 
allowing such delays only as are rendered unavoidable by acci- 
dent, injury or rain. He must, until the completion of the game, 
require the players of each side to promptly take their positions in 
the field as soon as the third hand is put out, and must require 



PLAYING RULES. 



4<J 



the first striker of the opposite side to be in his position at the 
bat as soon as the fielders are in their places. 

(2.) The players of the side "at bat" must occupy the por- 
tion of the field allotted them, but must speedily vacate any por- 
tion thereof that may be in the way of the ball, or of any Fielder 
attempting to catch or field it. The triangular space behind the 
Home Base is reserved for the exclusive use of the Umpire, 
Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must prohibit any player 
of the side "at bat" from crossing the same at any time while the 
ball is in the hands of, or passing between, the Pitcher and 
Catcher, while standing in their positions. 

(3.) The Umpire is master of the Field from the com- 
mencement to the termination of the game, and must compel the 
players to observe the provisions of all the Playing Rules, and he 
is hereby invested with authority to order any player to do or omit 
to do any act, as he may deem it necessary to give force and effect 
to any and all of such provisions, and powers to inflict upon any 
player disobeying any such order a fine of not less than five nor 
more than twenty-five dollars for each offense, and to impose a 
similar fine upon any player who shall use abusive, threatening or 
Improper language to the Umpire. , 

(4.) The Umpire shall at once notify the Captain of the 
offending player's side of the infliction of any fine herein pro- 
Tided for. 

Rule 62. A fair batted ball that goes over the fence at a less 
distance than two hundred and ten feet from Home Base shall 
entitle the Batsman to two bases, and a distinctive line shall be 
marked on the fence at this point. The Umpire shall not reverse 
his decision on any point of play upon the testimony of any 
player engaged in the game, or upon the testimony of any by- 
stander. 

Rule 63. The Umpire shall not be changed during the progress 
of a Match Game, except for reason of illness or injury. 

Rule 64. For the special benefit of the patrons ot the game, 
and because the offences specified are under his immediate juris- 
diction, and not subject to appeal by players, the attention of the 
Umpire is particularly directed to possible violations of the pur- 
pose and spirit of the Rules, of the following character: 

(1.) Laziness or loafing of players in taking their places 
in the field, or those allotted them by the Rules when their 
side is at the bat, and especially any failure to keep the bats in the 
racks provided for them ; to be ready (two men) to take position 
as Batsmen, and to remain upon the Players' Bench, except when 
otherwise required by the Rules. 

(2.) Any attempt by players of the side at bat, by calling 



50 



PLAYING RULES. 



to a Fielder, other than the one designated by his Captain, to field 
a ball, or by any other equally disreputable means seeking to dis- 
concert a Fielder. 

(3.) Indecent or improper language addressed by a player 
to the audience, the Umpire, or any player. In any of these cases 
the Umpire should promptly fine the offending player. 

(4.) The Rules make a marked distinction between hind- 
rance of an adversary in fielding a batted or thrown ball. This 
has been done to rid the game of the childish excuses and claims 
formerly made by a Fielder failing to hold a ball to put out a Base 
Runner. But there may be cases of a Base Runner so flagrantly 
violating the spirit of the Rules and of the Game in obstructing a 
Fielder from fielding a thrown ball that it would become the duty 
of the Umpire, not only to declare the Base Runner "out" (and 
to compel any succeeding Base Runners to hold their bases), but 
also to impose a heavy fine upon him. For example: If the Base 
Runner plainly strike at the ball while passing him, to prevent its 
being caught by a Fielder; if he hold a fielder's arms so as to dis- 
able him from catching the ball, or if he knock the Fielder down 
for the same purpose. 

(5.) In the case of a "Block," if the person not engaged 
in the game should retain possession of the ball, or throw or kick 
it beyond the reach of the Fielders the Umpire should call 
"Time" and require each base runner to stop at the last base 
touched by him until the ball be returned to the pitcher standing 
in his position. 

(6.) The Umpire must call "Play" at the exact time ad- 
vertised for beginning a game, and any player not then ready to 
take the position allotted him, must be promptly fined by the Um- 
pire. 

(7.) The Umpire is only allowed, by the Rules, to call 
"Time" in case of an accident to himself or a player, or in case of 
rain, as defined by the Rules. The practice of players suspend- 
ing the game to discuss or contest a decision with the Umpire, is 
a gross violation of the Rules, and the Umpire should promptly 
fine any player who interrupts the game in this manner. 

SCORING. 

Rule 65. In Older to Promote Uniformity in Scoring Cham- 
pionship Games, the following instructions, suggestions and defini- 
tions are made for the benefit of scorers, and they are required 
to make all scores in accordance therewith. 

BATTING. 

(1.) The first item in the tabulated score, after the player's 
name and position, shall be the number of times he has been at 



PLAYING RULES. 



51 



bat during the game. Any time or times where the player has 
been sent to base by being hit by a pitched ball or by the pitcher s 
illegal delivery, shall not be included in this column. 

(2.) In the second column should be set down the runs 
made by each player. 

(3.) In the third column should be placed the first base 
hits made by each player. A base hit should be scored in the 
following cases: 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground between the foul 
lines, and out of reach of the fielders. 

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a fielder In 
motion, but such player cannot recover himself in time to handle 
the ball before the striker reaches First Base. 

When the ball is hit so sharply to an infielder that he cannot 
handle it in time to put out a man. In case of doubt over this 
class of hits, score a base hit and exempt the fielder from the 
charge of an error. 

When a ball is hit so slowly toward a fielder that he cannot 
handle it in time to put out a man. 

When the batsman is awarded a base on balls. 



BASE RUNNING. 

(4.) In the fourth column shall be scored bases stolen, and 
shall include every base made after first base has been reached 
by a base runner, except those made by reason of, or with the aid 
of a "battery" error, or by batting, "balks" or by being forced 
off. In short, shall include all bases made by a "clean steal," 
or through a wild throw or muff of the ball by a fielder who is 
directly trying to put the base runner out while attempting to steal 
a base. 

FIELDING. 

(5.) The number of opponents put out by each player 
shall be set down in the fifth column. Where a striker is given 
out by the Umpire for a foul strike, or because he struck out of 
his turn, the put-out shall be scored to the Catcher. 

(6.) The number of times the player assists shall be set down 
in the sixth column. An assist should be given to each player 
who handles the ball in assisting a run-out or other play of the kind. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play in time 
to put a runner out, even if the player who should complete the 
play fails, through no fault of the player assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player who 
handles the ball from the time it leaves the bat until it reaches the 
player who makes the put-out, or in case of a thrown ball, to each 
player who throws or handles it cleanly, and in such a way that a 



52 



PLAYING RULES 



put-out results, or would result if no error were made by the re- 
ceiver. 

An assist shall be given the Pitcher when the Batsman fails to 
hit the ball on the fourth strike, ar<l the same shall also be entered 
in the summary under the head of "struck out." 

(7.) An error shall be given in the seventh column for each 
misplay which allows the striker or base-runner to make one or 
more bases, when perfect play would have insured his being put 
out; except that "wild pitches," "bases on called balls," "bases 
on the batsman being struck by a pitched ball," or case of illegal 
pitched ball, balks and passed balls, shall not be included in said 
column. In scoring errors off batted balls see Section 3 of this 
Rule. 

Rule 66. The Summary shall contain • 

(1.) The number of earned runs made by each side. 

(2.) The number of two-base hits made by each player. 

(3.) The number of three-base hits made by each player. 

(4.) The number of home runs made by each player. 

(5.) The number of double and triple plays made by each 
tide, with the names of the players assisting in the same. 

(6.) The number of men given bases on called balls, by each 
Pitcher. 

(7.) The number of men given bases from being hit by 
pitched balls. 

(8.) The number of passed balls by each Catcher. 

(9.) The number of wild pitches by each Pitcher. 

(10.) The time of game. 

(11.) The name of the Umpire. 

AMENDMENTS. 

RULE 67. No Amendment or change of any of these National 
Playing Rules shall be made, except by a joint committee on 
rules consisting of three members from the National League and 
three members from the American Association. Such committee 
to be appointed at the annual meetings of each of said bodies 
to serve one year from the twentieth day of December of 
each year. Such committee shall have full power to act, provided 
that such amendments shall be made only by an affirmative vote 
of the majority of each delegation. 



Special Meeting of the National League of Professional, 
Base Ball Clubs held at th3 Tremont House, Chicago, 
Wednesday, Aug. 25, 1886. 

Present: 

A. G. Spalding and W. I. Culver, representing the Chicago Ball 

Club. 
G. H. Schmelz, and F. F. Espenshied, representing the St. Louis 

Athletic Association. 
A. V. McKim and J. J Heim, representing the Kansas City Base 

Ball Association. 
J. A. Marsh and Jno. B. Molony, representing the Detroit Base 

Ball Association. 
Frank L. Sandord, representing the Boston Base Ball Association. 
Walter F. Hewett, representing the Washington National Base 

Ball Club. 
James Mutrie, representing the New York Ball Club. 

Meeting called to order by the President at II A. M. 

Mr. Schmelz submitted an amendment to the League Consti- 
tution permitting Sunday games, which was lost. 

On motion, the Secretary was authorized and directed not to 
recognize contracts or releases until after the adjournment of this 
meeting. 

On motion, the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the President of the League be requested and 
authorized to appoint a committee of three representatives of 
League clubs, who shall be empowered to consider and determine 
all questions relative to the release and employment of players at 
present under contract with any League Club, the decision of 
such committee in all cases to be final; such committee to have 
the power, in case of the withdrawal of any club from the League, 
or in case of its expulsion, to provide for the apportionment of 
its players among the remaining League clubs as in the opinion 
of such committee the best interests of the League may require; 
the power and duties of such committee to continue until further 
action by the League. Each and every club of the League is 
hereby bound by the action of this meeting, and by this resolu- 
tion, and in the event of its release of any player, such com- 
mittee shall be the sole arbiter as to the club by whom such 
player may be employed. Such committee shall be and is hereby 
authorized and empowered, in the event of any club desiring to 
sell its franchise and contracts with players, to purchase the same 
and to play the players thereof in the same city, or any city, as 
they may deem for the best interests of the League, and all games 

(53) 



I 



54 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



played by such club shall be considered and treated as League 
games, as though played under the present schedule, and count as 
championship games. In the event of any club disbanding, or 
withdrawing from the League, or forfeiting its membership 
therein, said committee shall have the power to dispose of its 
franchise and players, as in case of purchase thereof. Any 
action of such committee to be effectual, must be unanimous. 

On motion, the President was requested to appoint Messrs. 
Spalding, Day and iMolony as such committee, which request was 
subsequently complied with and the gentlemen named duly 
appointed to constitute the committee under the above resolution. 

No further business appearing, on motion adjourned. 

N. E. Young, 

Prcs. and Sec'y. 



Meeting of the Board of Directors of the National 
League of Professional Base Ball Clubs held at the 
Tremont House, Chicago, III., Wednesday, Nov. 17, 18S6. 

Meeting called to order at 11 A. M. 

Present: 

N. E. Young, Chairman, and Messrs. Jno. B. Day, A. H. 
Soden, F. K. Stearns and Wm. Stromberg, Directors. 

The Secretary presented a tabular statement of championship 
games won and lost during the season of 18S6. 

On motion, the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the Chicago Ball Club of Chicago, 111., having 
won the greatest percentage of games in the championship series, 
is hereby awarded the League championship of the United States 
for the year 1S86. 

The report of the Treasurer was received and accepted. 

Mr. N. E. Young was re-elected Secretary. 

Mr. Herman Doscher presented an appeal for reinstatement. 

On motion, the disabilities of Mr. Doscher were removed. 

Upon the unanimous request of the Board of Directors, the 
charges of the Chicago Club vs. A. A. Irwin were withdrawn. 

On motion, adjourned. 

N. E. Young, Chaiimai 
A. II. Soden, ~] 

E^St^Ins, W<°- 
Wm. Stromberg, J 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



55 



Annual Meeting of the National' League of Professional 
Base Hall Clubs held at the Tremont House, Chicaco, 
III., Wednesday, Nov. 17, 1886. 

Present : 

Jno. I. Rogers and A. J. Reach, representing the Philadelphia 

Ball Club. 
A. G. Spalding and W. I. Culver, representing the Chicago Ball 

Club. 
Jno. li. Day, representing the New York Ball Club. 
F. K. Stearns, representing the Detroit Base Ball Association. 
A. II. Soden and \V. H. Conant, representing the Boston Base 

Ball Association. 
J. |. Heim and E. E. Mengis, representing the Kansas City 

Base Ball Association. 
Wm. Stromberg and Thos. A. Russel, representing the St. Louis 

Athletic Association. 
R. C. Ilewett and W. F. Hewett, representing the Washington 

National Base Ball Club. 

Meeting called to order by the President ai 1 v. M. 

On motion, the reading of the minutes of the last meeting was 
dispensed with. . 

The report of the Board of Directors was teceived and ac- 
cepted. 

( )n motion, a committee of three was appointed with full 
power to confer with the Pittsburg Club and arrange for their 
admission as League members. 

The Chair appointed Jno. B. Day, A. G. Spalding and Jno. I. 
Rogers as such committee. 

On motion, 'adjourned until 3 P, M. 

Meeting called to order at 3 p. M. 

The committee appointed to confer with the Pittsburgh Club 
reported that that organization applied for League membership. 
The report of the committee was accepted, and upon a ballot 
being passed, the Pittsburg Club was unanimously elected, and 
Messrs. W. A. Nimick and A. K. Scandrett were duly admitted 
as the representatives of that organization. 

On motion, the rules were suspended for the purpose of con- 
sidering Playing Rules which were unanimously adopted as per 



i6 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



report of Joint Committee on National Playing Rules. (See 
National Playing Rules). 

On motion, adjourned to 10 A. M. on the following day. 

Thursday, Nov. 18, 18S6. 

Meeting called to order at n A. M, 

The committee appointed at the special meeting held Aug. 25, 
1886, having control over the release of players, etc., submitted 
thair report, which on motion was accepted and the committee 
discharged. 

The League Constitution was amended as follows: (See Con- 
stitution.) 

On motion, the Board of Directors were requested to approve 
any additional sum paid to umpires by the Secretary. 

Mr. N. E. Young was re-elected President. 

The following named gentlemen were elected Directors, viz.: 
W. A. Nimick, E. E. Mengis, Jno. B. Day and A. J. Reach. 

The following named gentlemen were elected members of the 
Schedule Committee, viz.: A. G. Spalding, F. K. Stearns and 

A. J. Reach. 

On motion, the Schedule Committee was requested to confer 
■with a similar committee from the American Association. 

On motion, the present members of the Arbitration Committee 
— viz.: N. E. Young, Jno. I. Rogers and Jno. B. Day — were 
continued for one year. 

On motion, Messrs. A. G. Spalding, Jno. I. Rogers and Jno. 

B. Day were continued as members of the Joint Committee on 
Playing Rules until Dec. 20, 1887: 

On motion, the following resolution was adopted: 
Resolved, That the League elect a committee of three repre- 
sentatives of League clubs, who shall be empowered to consider 
and determine all questions relative to the release and employ- 
ment of players under contract with any League club which the 
committee unanimously consider in danger of probable disband- 
ment, the decision of such committee in all cases to be final; such 
committee to have the power, in case of the withdrawal of any 
club from the League, or in case of its expulsion, to provide for the 
apportionment of its players among the remaining League clubs as 
in the opinion of such committee the best interests of the League 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



57 



may require; the power and duties of such committee to continue 
until their successors are elected at the next annual meeting. 
Each and every club of the League is hereby bound by the action 
of this meeting and by this resolution, and in the event of its re- 
lease of any player, such committee shall be the sole arbiter as to 
the club by whom such player may be employed. Such com- 
mittee shall be, and is hereby authorized and empowered, in the 
event of any club desiring to sell its franchise and contracts with 
players, to purchase the same and to play the players thereof in 
the same city, or any city, as they may deem for the best interests 
of the League, and all games played by such club shall be con- 
sidered an treated as League games, as though played under the 
regular schedule, and count as championship games. In the 
event of any club disbanding or withdrawing from the League, or 
forfeiting its membership therein, said committee shall have the 
power to dispose of its franchise and players, as in case of pur- 
chase thereof. Any action of such committee to le effectual, 
, must be unanimous. 

Messrs. N. E. Young, A. G. Spalding and Jno. B. Day were 
elected to constitute the committee under the above resolution. 

On motion, the contract for printing was awarded to Jno. B. 
Sage of Buffalo, N. Y. 

On motion, the publication of the League Book was left in the 
hands of the Secretary. 

It was moved and seconded that when this annual meeting 
adjourns, it adjourn to meet subject to the call of the President in 
the spring. Carried. 

On motion, the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the next annual meeting be held in New York 
City. 

On motion, the special agreement made with the Washington 
Club was continued for one year, and the President authorized to 
sign said agreement on the part of the League. 

On motion, adjourned. 

N. E. Young, 

Pres. and Sec'y. 



58 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



Special Meeting of the National League of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs held at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New- 
York City, Monday, March 7, 1887. 

Present: 

A. G. Spalding and J. \V. Spalding, representing the Chicago 
Ball Club. 

Jno. B. Day and C. T. Dillingham, representing the New York 
Ball Club. 

Jno. I. Rogers, representing the Philadelphia Ball Club. 

F. K. Stearns, representing the Detroit Base Ball Association. 

A, H. Soden and \V. H. Conant, representing the Boston Base 
Ball Association. 

\V. Clough, representing the Kansas City Base Ball Association. 
W. A Nimickand A. K. Scandrett, representing the Allegheny 
Base Ball Association. 

B. J. Fine and Wm. Stromberg, representing the St. Louis 
League Base Ball Co. 

K. C. Hewett and Walter F. Hewett, representing the Wash- 
ington National Base Ball Club. 

Meeting called to order at 12 o'clock noon. 

On motion the reading of the minutes of the previous meeting 
was dispensed with. 

The Special Committee elected at the last meeting, to "consider 
and determine all questions relative to the release and employ- 
ment of players," etc., submitted their report, which, on motion, 
was received and accepted. 

On motion the regular order of business was suspended for the 
purpose of considering miscellaneous business. 

Mr. Soden asked for a declaration from the St. Louis Club in 
relation to their remaining in the League. 

Mr. B. J. Fink, representing St. Louis, stated that unless they 
were conceded the right and privilege of playing Sunday cham- 
pionship games that they could not go through the season without 
losing money, and as they were satisfied that this concession 
would not be made they did not propose to continue their mem- 
bership in the League. 

Mr. F. also stated that they had received a very liberal offer 
from Kansas City for their franchise and players, and they were 
desirous that the League should ratify and sanction the sale. 



OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



59 



Mr. Clougii, representing Kansas City, stated that unless 
they were permitted to strengthen their nine by the purchase of 
St. Louis players, that they did not propose to continue their 
membership. 

On motion the Special Committee, consisting of Messrs. 
Young, Day and Spalding, was instructed to confer with repre- 
sentatives from St. Louis, Kansas City and Indianapolis, and 
submit their report with such recommendations as they may be 
pleased to make. 

On motion adjourned to meet at 10 A. M. on the following day. 

Tuesday, March 8, 1SS7. 



Meeting called to order at 10 A. M., and on motion adjourned 
to meet at 3 P. M. 

Meeting called to order at 3 P. M. 

The Special Committee submitted their report, which, on mo- 
tion, was accepted and approved. 

On motion the regular order of business was resumed. 

The Secretary presented the application of the Indianapolis 
Base Ball Association for League membership. Upon a ballot 
being passed they were unanimously elected, and Messrs. Louis 
Newberger and J. H. Martin were duly admitted as the repre- 
sentatives of that organization, and the signed agreement adopted 
and approved by the League. 

In case of the official release by the Secretary of Messrs. Rad- 
ford, Arundel, Callender, Toohy and Cahill, all League clubs 
agreed to waive their rights to accept their services. 

The President was authorized and instructed to accept the res- 
ignations of the St. Louis and Kansas City Clubs when officially 
received, the same to take effect from the date of promulgation. 

Mr. Day moved that the proposition received from Kansas 
City be not accepted. Carried. 

On motion adjourned to meet at 9 A. M, on the following day. 



I 



60 



SPECIAL MEETINGS 



Wednesday, March 9, 1887. 

Meeting called to order at 9 A. M. 

The Special Committee reported that Kansas City Club had ac- 
cepted the League's original proposition. 

The report of Committee was accepted. 

Mr. F. K. Stearns was elected a League director to fill a pro- 
spective vacancy. 

The Schedule Committee submitted their report, which was 
adopted. 

The Pittsburg Club was, on motion, granted the same privilege 
accorded to Washington — that of selling three tickets for one 
dollar. 

On motion the Secretary was instructed to furnish the Daily 
Base Ball Gazette with all official communications intended for 
publication. 

The Secretary was also instructed to furnish the following 
weekly papers with such communications, viz. : Sportsman' s Ref- 
eree, Pittsburg, Pa., Sporting Life, Philadelphia, Pa., Sporting 
Times, New York, and Sporting Nevis, St. Louis. 

The following resolution was unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That on any vacant dates in the championship season 
the home club be permitted to play any championship games 
scheduled for other dates with other League clubs, or, exhibition 
games with any non-League clubs, if said dates are not required 
for postponed championship games. 

No further business appearing, on motion, adjourned. 

N. E. Young, 

Pres. and See. 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS. 

The following is an official list of the Officers of the National 
League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, and Officers and Players 
of Clubs, members thereof, for the season of 1887, so far as com- 
pleted to March 10, 18S7: 

N. E. YOUNG, Pres. and Sec, Box 536, Washington, D. C. 

DIRECTORS. 

W. A. Nimick, E. E. Mengis, Jno. B. Day, A. J. Reach. 

BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION OF BOSTON, 
MASS. 



A. H. Soden, Ptesident, 



No. 116 Water St. 



S .W Wise, 
M. J. Kelly, 
W. H. Wheelock, 
Jos. Hornung, 
Chas. Radbourn, 
T. J. Poorman. 



M. J. Madden, 
W. H. Higgins, 
R. F. Johnston, 
Jno. F. Morrill, 
M. E. Murphy, 



J. B. Billings, Treasurer, 
Box iys6. 
C. F. Daily, 
T. J. O'Rourke, 
E. B. Sutton, 
E. C. Tate, 
R. B. Conway, 



CHICAGO BALL CLUB OF CHICAGO, ILL. 



A. G. Spalding, President, 

No. 108 Madison St. 
Adrian C. Anson, Dell Darling 
Thos. Burns, 
Mark E, Baldwin, 
J. G. Clarkson, 
Thos. Daily, 



Frank S. Flint, 
Jno. Flynn, 
Louis Hardie, 
E. N. Williamson, 



Jno. A. Brown, Secretary, 
No. 165 Loomis St. 
Fred. Pfeffer, 
Harry J. Pyle, 
Jas. Ryan, 
W. A. Sunday, 
M. C. Sullivan. 



DETROIT BASE BALL ASSOCIATION OF DETROIT, 
MICH. 

Fred. K. Stearns, President. Robt, II. Leadley, Secretary. 

Geo. E. Knowlton, Wm. Shindle, C. B. Baldwin, 

Tas. H. Manning, F. W. Smith, 

Thos. J. Gillen, J. C. Rowe, 

Peter J. Conway, Ed. Hanlon, 

L. Twitchell, Fred. Dunlap, 

Jas. L. White, D. Brouthers, 



Chas. W. Ganzell 
Chas. W. Bennett, 
S. L. Thompson, 
Hardy Richardson, 
Chas. Briody, 
Chas. Getzein. 



NEW YORK BALL CLUB OF NEW YORK CITY. 



Peter Weckbecker, 
Jno. J. Cuff, 
Richard Cooke, 
P. Gillespie, 
Wm. George, 



C. M. Gaunt, Jr., 
Jerry Totten, 

R. H. Hutchings, 
M. J. Mattimore, 

D. Richardson. 

(61) 



Michael Tiernan, 
Geo. F. Gore, 
J. M. Becannon, 
W. S. Roberts, 



62 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS. 



PHILADELPHIA BALL CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA, 
PA. 

A. J Reach President, j N0 . j. Rogers, Secretary, 

No. 23 So. Eighth St. Uo. 13S So. Sixth St. 

^ ,„ .r Harry Wright, Manager. 

Geo W. Henry, Frank J. Murphy, L.Gibson, 

A. A. Irwin Thos. F. McCarthy, Jos. Mulvey, 

August Wehlmg, Jno. Clements, Geo. E. Andrews, 

Geo. T. Stalling, Jas. E. Dallas, Ledell Titcomb, 

Jas. Devlin, J. G. Fogarty. 

PITTSBURG (ALLEGHENY) BASE BAi)l CLUB OF 

PITTSBURG, PA. 

W. A Nimick, President, A. K. Scandrett, Secretary, 

No. 32 Ross St. Sheriff's Office. 

Horace B. Phillips, Manager. 



Jno. J. Fields, 
Thos. T. Brown, 
Jas. F. Galvin, 
C. M. Smith, 
J. F. Coleman, 
Geo. F. Miller, 



S. W. Barkley, 
Fred. H. Carroll, 
Geo. Vanllalstren, 
W. J. Kuehne, 
A. Dalrymple. 
A. McKinnon, 



J. E. Handiboe, 
Wm. R. Bishop, 
Fred. J. Mann, 
A. W. Whitney, 
E. Morris, 



WASHINGTON (NATIONAL) BASE BALL CLUB OF 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Robt. C. Hewett, President. Walter F. Hewett, Secretary, 

1227 Seventh St., N. IV. 
„, .,. „ , J- H. GAFFNEY, Manager. 

Philip Baker, W. F. Kreig, A. W. Stuart, 

Saml. Crane, G. W. Keefe, Connie Mack, 

P. E Dea y, J. T . McGlone, R. M. Keating, 

Jno. Farrell, H. O'Day, Frank Gilmore, 

Geo. Shock. 



THE INDIANAPOLIS BASE BALL ASSOCIATION. 



LEAGUE HATTING AVERAGES. 



m 



THE LEAGUE AVERAGES FOR 1886. 

The following are the official averages of the players of the eight League 
Clubs for 1880, giving the names of players who took part la fifteen 
championship contests or more during the season. 

BATTING AVERAGES. 



NAMK. 



Kelly 

Anson 

Broathers .. 

Connor 

Richardson. 

Glasscock... 

Hines 

Thompson.. 
J O'Kourke... 
( Kwing 

Ryan 

Gore 

Rowe 

McKlnnon.. 

Shock 

Fogarty 

Dorgan 

Wise. 
< Itullinton. .. 

White 

Dunlap. . .. 

Nash 

Stemmyer . . 
( Mvers... .. 

20J-J Sutton 

f Burn* 

„, (Wood 

■" 1 Ward 

«, I J Gillespie.... 
' lOan/ell 

Mulvey 

Deasley 

Esterbrook. 

PfeflYr 

Poorman. .. 

Busseit 

Hornung 

Denny 

Kreig 

Ferguson... 

Sweeney 

BoyU 











© 


GD 






© 


CLUB. 


eg 


3 
pa 


0) 

04 




S 

09 

O 


a 

CD 
00 


00 

OB 


00 

6 

00 


a 

09 

o 




CO 

at 


S3 


32 


9 

P. 


H 


a 


m 


O 

P. 




ti 

03 


a 


a 




> 


00 






> 




a 


H 


w 


■■J 


u, 


Ph 


H 


"t 


Chicago 


UK 


451 


155 


1.31 


175 


.388 


231 


1.98 


(i 


125 


504 


117 


0,93 


187 


.871 


259 


2,07 


Detroit 


12! 


489 


189 


1,14 


181 


.370 


284 


2.34 


New York... 


118 


4W 


105 


>fi 


172 


.354 


246 2.08 




125 


588 


125 


1.00 


189 


.351 


271 


2,17 


St. Louis.... 


121 


486 


9B 


79 


158 


.32") 


196 


1.6l 


Washington.. 


121 


4S7 


80 


0.66 


152 


.312 


216 


1.78 


Detroit 




503 


1000.82 


1!)B 


.810 


227 


1.86 


New York.... 


1U1 


440 


106 1.02 


136 


.309 


172 


1.B5 


ii 


vo 


275 


590.84 


85 


31)9 


113 


1,61 




84 


:«7 


58 0.69 


ion 


.3116 


142 


1,69 


" 


118 


444 


150 


1 27 


135 


,304 


193 


1 63 




111 


4'.8 


97 


0,87 


142 


,803 


197 


1 77 




122 


491 


75 


0.61 


148 


.301 


189 1.55 


Washington.. 


MB 


95 


11 


0.4'.' 


28 


.294 


84 


1.30 


Philadelphia. 


76 


880 


64 


0.71 


82 


.292 


112 


1.47 


New York... 


118 


•11-' 


61 


0.51 


129 


.292 


157 


1.33 




9B 


387 


71 


0.74 


112 


.289 


15B 


1.62 


it 


44 


176 


27 


0.61 


51 


.289 


68 


1.31 




1SS4 


4U1 


65 


0.52 


142 


.289 


171 


1.8(1 


St. L. &Det.. 


122 


48 > 


8H 


0,68 


137 


.284 


184 


1 .'0 




109 


417 


61 


0.56 


117 


.280 


119 


1.36 


4* 


41 


148 


£1 


0.58 


41 


.277 


47 


1.15 


Kansas City.. 


118 


473 


»9 


0.59 


131 


276 


IB! 


1.38 




lib 


499 


83 


0.71 


1)18 


.276 


178 


1 53 


Philadelphia. 


111 


445 


64 


0,57 


123 


.276 


167 


1,50 


10B 


450 


81 


0.76 


123 


.273 


183 


1.72 


New York... 


ISM 


491 


82 


0.B7 


134 


.273 


161 


1.32 


» ( 


98 


8MB 


65 


0.0B 


108 


272 


131 


1.3.1 


Detroit....... 


54 


213 


28 


0.51 


58 


.272 


71 


1.31 


Philadelphia. 
New York ... 


105 


430 


71 


0.67 


115 


.267 


157 


1.49 


il8 


143 


18 


11.47 


38 


.265 


45 


1.18 


»* 


123 


47.1 


Si 1 


0,50 


125 


,2114 


160 


1.80 




119 


474 


88 0.74 


125 


.263 


183 


1.53 




88 


371 


72 0.8! 


97 


.261 


1321.50 


Kansas City.. 


90 


348 


41 


11.45 


89 


,2i;o 


107 


1.19 




94 


■1:1 


6V 


0.71 


109 


.257 


130 


1.3H 


St. Louis 


119 


475 


58 


0.48 


122 


.257 


169 


1.42 


Washington.. 
Philadelphia. 


27 


98 


10 


0.87 


25 


.256 


37 


1.37 


VI 


261 


56 


0.78 


66 


.252 


60 


1.12 




17 


64 


4 


0.23 


16 


.250 


17 


1.00 


H 


80 


108 


8 


0.26 


27 


.250 


80 


1.00 



53 
29 
*l 
17 
42 
38 
21 
13 
14 
18 
10 
23 
12 
10 
3 
SO 



31 
8 
9 
20 
16 
3 
8 
18 
15 
9 
3B 
17 
5 
27 
2 
13 
30 
SI 
6 
16 
18 
2 
9 





64 LEAGUE BATTING AVERAGES — CONTINUED. 

Batting Record. — Continued. 



NAME. 



Andrews 

Farrar 

McQuery. ., 

Morrill 

J Sunday. ... 
I Bennett. 

Rowe 

(Whitney.... 

■j Daily 

(Johnston. . 

Seery 

( Briody , 

I Radbourn. . 
I McCormick 
I Conway 

Hanlon. ... 

Clarkson. . 

Irwin 

Ringo , 

Dalrymple. 

(J.iinn 

Richardson. 

Radford.... 

Start 

Carroll. ... 
1 McGeachy.. 

J Tate 

j Daily 

Farrell 

Gunning — 
j Baker 

Cosick 

Ba'tlan. ... 

Hackett 

Burdock... 

Williamson 
\ Welch 

Houck 

Knowles 

ClementB. . 

Flint 

( Donnelly. ., 
I Baldwin ... 

Flynn 

Cahill 

McGulre... 
1 Gerhardt. ., 
} Gllligan . . . 

Myers 

I Corcoran.. . 
1 Mtnalag... 



CLUB. 



Philadelphia. 

Kansas City.. 
Boston.. 
Chicago. 
Detroit. . 
KanBasCity.. 

Boston . . . 

St. Louis. 
Kansas City.. 
Boston.. 
Chicago. . . 
Kan.C. &Det 
Detroit. . 
Chicago. 
Philade pbia. 
Kansas City. 

Chicago 

St. Louis.... 
New York. . . 
KanaasCity.. 
Washington. 
u 

Det. &St. L.', 

Boston 

Philadelphia. 
Phil. &Wash 
Boston. 
Washington. 
Philadelphia. 

Kansas Cily.. 
Boston . 
Chicago. 
New York... 
Washington.. 

Philadelphia! 

Chicago.. 

KanBasCity.. 

Detroit... 

Chicago.. 

St. Louis. 

Philadelphia. 

New York. 

Washington.. 

St. Louis 

Washington. 
Detroit 



2 


"3 


•d 




■4* 

m 




to 


S 


J3 


CQ 


u 


O 


» 




u 


O 


cu 






M 




a) 




U 


<n 




CO 


o. 


m 


a 


m 


a> 


a 


at 

H 


ID 

a 


© 


tn 


g 


3 


a> 














o 




a 


H 


a 


< 


tb 


Ph 


H 


< 


106 


437 


93 


0.87 


109 


.249 


136 


1 as 


118 


439 


55 


0.46 


109 


,248 


151 


1.28 


m 


449 


62 


0.51 


111 


247 


140 


1 14 


117 


430 


86 


0.73 


106 


246 


156 


1 33 


25 


103 


16 


0.64 


25 


242 


80 


1 20 


69 


235 


37 


0.53 


57 


212 


85 


1.23 


105 


429 


53 


50 


103 


,240 


121 


1,15 


67 


247 


25 


0.37 


59 


,239 


73 


1.09 


50 


180 


25 


0,50 


43 


239 


50 


1,00 


109 


413 


48 


0.44 


99 


219 


128 


1.17 


1-'') 


453 


73 


0.58 


108 


,238 


135 


1.07 


55 


215 


14 


0.25 


M 


237 


61 


1.11 


66 


253 


80 


0.45 


60 


,237 


71 


1.07 


42 


174 


17 


0.40 


41 


235 


54 


1.28 


o2 


2)4 


33 


0.53 


55 


235 


73 


1.17 


126 


494 


105 


0.83 


116 


,214 


147 


1.16 


55 


210 


21 


0.38 


49 


.233 


67 


1.22 


101 


373 


51 


0.50 


K7 


.238 


104 


1.03 


16 


56 


6 


0.87 


13 


.232 


17 


l.Ofi 


82 


3.31 


62 


0.75 


77 


.232 


108 


1.31 


75 


271 


33 


0.44 


63 


,232 


80 


1.06 


64 


237 


43 


0.67 


55 


.883 


64 


1.00 


122 


493 


78 


0.63 


113 


.229 


128 


1,06 


29 


122 


1(» 


0.34 


27 


.2211 


31 


1.07 


111 


433 


73 


0.65 


99 


828 


126 


1.13 


65 


254 


34 


0.52 


58 


.228 


SO 


1.83 


31 


106 


13 


0.42 


24 


. 2-.:i; 


28 


0.M) 


78 


309 


40 


0.51 


70 


.MB 


101 


1.29 


65 


231 


32 


0.49 


f2 


.225 


82 


1.8B 


27 


98 


'IB 


0.55 


22 


.224 


27 


1.00 


81 


825 


87 


0.45 


72 


.221 


89 


1.09 


27 


104 


10 


0.86 


28 


.221 


SO 


1.11 


104 


J73 


46 


0.44 


81 


.217 


118 


1.13 


62 


230 


18 


0.29 


10 


.217 


64 


1.03 


59 


221 


26 


044 


48 


.217 


54 


0.91 


121 


430 


1,9 


0.57 


93 


.216 


142 


1.17 


59 


213 


17 


0.28 


46 


.216 


54 


0.91 


51 


195 


14 


0.27 


42 


.215 


49 


0.96 


115 


443 


44 


0.38 


94 


.212 


142 


1.23 


54 


185 


15 


0.28 


38 


.2or, 


45 


0.83 


49 


173 


80 0.61 


35 


.202 


47 


96 


113 


438 


51 


0.45 


88 


.201 


98 0.86 


57 


2<)4 


%<■ 


0.43 


41 


.201 


52 0.91 


56 


205 


40 


71 


41 


.200 


62 


1.10 


125 


463 


43 


0.34 


92 


.198 


118 


0.94 


4H 


167 


25 


52 


83 


.197 


48 


1,00 


123 


426 


44 


0,35 


81 


.190 


102 


0,83 


Hi 


273 


2310.28 


52 


.11X1 


62 


0.75 


7K 


295 


260.33 


56 


.18!) 


6N 


0.87 


21 


SI 


90.4S 


15 


.IK) 


19 


0.90 


26 


97 


140 .54 


18 


.185 


881.00 



a 

« 

66 

10 

4 

9 

10 

4 

2 

5 

2 

11 

24 

O 

5 

1 

3 

50 

2 

24 



16 

12 

IS 

89 

4 

31 

10 



23 

13 

3 

IB 

1 

29 

1 

3 

13 

3 

4 

£0 

4 

1 

16 

3 

9 

16 

2 

8 

8 

6 

3 

7 



LEAGUE BATT'NG AVERAGES — CONTINUED. 65 

Batting Kecord — Continued. 



NAME. 



Hayes 

Force 

j Hardie 

I Getzein.... 

Lillie 

Crane 

Keefe 

Weidman.. 

Barr 

Oldfleld.... 

Crane 

j Graves 

I Casey 

Gladmon. . 

Kirby 

llealy 

Shaw 





■a 


tf 


T* 


© 

a 

09 


Ob 

a 






oi 

a 

03 


CLUB. 


03 
5 


m 


O 


o 


03 
03 


to 


es 


a 




m 
1 


to 

OJ 

a 


ffi 

a 


P. 

> 


« 
CO 

H 


Q 

t- 


n 

o 


P. 

i 




o 


H 


« 


0.27 


16 


.184 


26 


•4 
1.00 


Washington.. 


26 


87 




68 


242 


26 


11,38 


44 


181 


50 


73 




10 


SI 


4 


0.25 


9 


.176 


9 


0.56 




43 


165 


14 


0.32 


29 


,176 


40 


93 


Kansas City.. 


114 


416 


37 


0.32 


73 


.175 


78 


0.68 


Washington.. 


80 


292 


20 


0.25 


50 


.171 


65 


0.81 


New York.... 


64 


205 


26 


0.40 


35 


170 


48 


0.75 


Kansas City.. 


B1 


179 


13 


0.25 


30 


.167 


30 


0.58 


Washington.. 


22 


79 


6 


0.27 


13 


.164 


15 


0.68 


" 


19 


63 


2 


I). 10 


10 


.158 


11 


0.58 


St. L.& Det.. 


86 


301 


34 


9.89 


46 


.153 


58 


0.67 




41 


138 


7 


0.17 


21 


.152 


23 


0.56 


Philadelphia. 


44 


151 


11 


0.25 


23 


.152 


29 


0.66 


Washington.. 


44 


152 


17 


0.38 


21 


.138 


85 


0.79 


St. Louis 


41 


186 


10 


0.24 


15 


.110 


18 


0.44 


" 


42 


145 


10 


0.23 


14 


.0% 


16 


0.38 


Washington.. 


44 


148 


13 


0.29 


13 


.087 


15 


0.34 



■ 



66 



LEAGUE FIELDING AVERAGES. 



FIELDING AVERAGES 

Of League players who have taken part in fifteen or more championehlp 
games, Beaton of 1886. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 



NAME. 



CLUB. 





o 


to 




* 

u 
o 


m 

<0 










V 


- 


I, 


ra 


a 
■a 


Ph 




< 


M 


U 




« 
















a 

3 


s 

3 
S3 




a 


5 


o 


118 


1220 


45 


26 


1291 


27 


227 


IS 


6 


238 


118 


1164 


65 


34 


1261 


29 


1848 


7 


10 


365 


122 


i itsa 


50 


43 


1388 


121 


1256 


27 


42 


1325 


19 


176 


4 


6 


1H6 


66 


567 


13 


2') 


finn 


41 


SS6 


24 


16 


436 


119 


117(1 


35 


46 


12M 


121 


1188 


66 


48 


13112 


57 


587 


17 


25 


569 



**^ 



Farrar , 

Kreig 

Connor.... 

Start 

McQuery. . . 
Brouthers.. 
Bufflnton.., 

Baker 

Morrill 

McKinnon. 

Anson 

Wise 



Philadelphia. 
Washington.. 

New York 

Washington. . 
Kansas City.. 

Detroit 

Boston 

Washington.. 

Boston , 

St. Louis 

Chicago 

Boston 



.979 
.975 
.973 
.972 

.969 
.968 
.968 
.966 
.963 
963 
.963 
.956 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



Bastian i 

Richardson 

Dunlap 

Gerhard t 

Myers 

Crane 

;Pfeffer 

Burdock.... 

Farrell 

Knowlee. ... 

Morrill 

Sutton 

Wise 

Quinn 



Philadelphia.. 

Detroit 

St. Louis <fc Detroit. 

New York 

Kansas City. . . 

St. Louis & Detroit. 

Chicago 

Boston 

Phila. <b Wash 
Washington. . . . 
Boston , 



St Louie.. 



86 


157 


286 


26 


469 


37 


103 


IIP 


14 


235 


122 


842 


401 


55 


798 


123 


31(1 


355 


57 


752 


118 


298 


384 


65 


747 


1 1 


196 


214 


41 


451 


119 


313 


840 73 


756 


59 


145 


165 


33 


343 


65 


132 


191 


85 


358 


62 


196 


221 


47 


467 


20 


47 


63 


16 


126 


18 


44 


52 


14 


110 


20 


41 


44 


15 


100 


15 


33 


32 


14 


79 



.944 
.940 
.931 
.924 
.913 
.909 
.903 
.903 
.902 
' .899 
i .673 
.872 
.850 
.822 



THIRD BASEMEN. 









117 
123 
111 
105 
28 
90 
53 
124 
113 
44 
15 


182 
148 
149 
99 
34 
137 
68 
131 
153 
53 
33 


270 

219 

247 

191 

63 

177 

122 

245 

245 

74 

33 


53 
43 
49 
40 
14 
50 
34 
68 
73 
26 
14 


505 
4111 
445 
830 
111 
364 
224 
444 
471 
153 
80 


Mm 


1 




895 


9 




889 


8 




Philadelphia 


878 


4 

ft 




.874 
86K 


r> 




R48 


7 






847 


8 




845 


9 




R30 


10 




u ** 


.825 



LEAGUE FIELDING AVERAGES — CONTINUED. ()7 

SHORT STOPS. 



NAME. 



Force 

Glasscock.. 

Morrill 

Irwin 

Bassett 

Mutton 

Eowe 

| Williamson 
| Ward . . . 

Radford 

Uouck 

Nash 

Wise 



CLUB. 



Washington. 
St. Louis.... 

Boston 

Philadelphia 
Kansa9 City. 

Boston 

Detroit 

Chicago 

New York... 
Kansas City. 
Washington. 
Boston 



•a 




M 

a 




S 




o 


















$u 


Oh 




w 




u 


•< 


u 


DO 

| 



a 


a 


a 
"3 


o 


'A 


H 


w 


50 


58 


211 


27 


120 


156 


392 


57 


54 


92 


156 


29 


101 


137 


322 


56 


K2 


121 


277 


51 


27 


29 


84 


15 


109 


8fi 


310 


54 


121 


1H1 


355 


78 


122 


91 


369 


69 


HO 


52 


107 


26 


511 


58 


159 


36 


17 


23 


4H 


11 


18 


24 


39 


15 



.908 
.906 
."95 
.891 
1-86 



1281.883 

■150 .Srill 



,868 
.868 
.8 9 
.857 
.851 
.807 



FIELDERS. 



7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

IS 

14 
15 
1(1 

17 

18 

in 

20 
21 
22 

23 
24 



Baker 

Fogarty 

Dalrymple.. 
Richardson. 
Uornung.... 
Manning.... 
Thompson.. 

Ewing 

H'inlon 

O'Kourke... 

Sunday 

Wood 

Poorraan.... 
Andrews.... 
Gillespie ... 
Richardson. 

lllnea 

Ferguson... 

Flinn 

(£ulnn 

Johnston.... 

Radford 

Dorgan.... 

Llllie 

Shock 

Seery 

McGeachy. 

Gore 

Cahill 

Crane 

Carroll 



Washington.. 

Philadelphia. 

Chicago 

New York 

Boston 

Detroit 



New York 

Detroit 

New York 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

New York 

Detroit 

Washington 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

Boston 

Kaneat City 

New York 

Kansas City 

Washington 

Si. Louis 

Detroit & St. Lonis. 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

Washington 



21 


31 








31 


56 


114 


9 


6 


129 


82 


126 


15 


7 


14R 


58 


94 


7 


5 


106 


91 


187 


12 


11 


210 


26 


32 


4 


;J 


38 


1« 


191 


29 


13 


236 


20 


27 


4 


2 


S3 


125 


205 


18 


17 


240 


58 


10 1 


11 


9 


121 


25 


50 


3 


5 


BR 


W 


148 


13 


17 


178 


88 


145 


21 


1H 


184 


103 


11-9 


24 


23 


230 


98 


121 


6 


14 


141 


81 


131 


21 


17 


169 


Ui> 


167 


19 


21 


207 


29 


39 


4 


5 


48 


24 


15 


2 


2 


19 


48 


8U 


13 


12 


114 


109 


241 


29 


33 


305 


91 


125 


29 


19 


173 


116 


153 


13 


21 


187 


114 


199 


30 


30 


259 


25 


28 


2 


4 


34 


126 


176 


20 


26 


222 


61 


88 


19 


15 


122 


118 


1H4 


20 


29 


233 


122 


166 


34 


ai 


231 


68 


107 


16 


19 


MS 


111 


15 i 


32 


28 


203 



l.OOn 
.953 
.952 
.951 
.947 
.947 
.945 
.939 
.929 
.9« 
.914 
.904 
.902 
.902 
.900 
.899 
.b98 
.895 
.891 
.894 
.891 
.890 
.887 
.884 
.882 
.882 
.877 
.875 
.866 
.866 
.8M 



68 LEAGUE FIELDING AVERAGES CONTINUED. 



Fielders' Averages — Continued. 



NAME. 



Sutton.. 

Rowe 

Whitney 

Ryan 

Daily.... 
Conway. 
Kelly.... 



CLUB. 



Boston 

Kansas City 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 

Kan. City & Detroit 
Chicago 



















m 




T3 

s 


O 




o 


ID 

C 












h 




w 




Ph 




< 




.a 




© 






o 


s 


s 

s 


a 


"3 


3 


23 


f. 


P 


ta 


H 


43 


74 


5 


13 


92 


90 


154 


11 


29 


194 


211 


IK 


9 


5 


32 


67 


93 


18 


21 


13) 


52 


88 


17 


22 


127 


82 


54 


8 


13 


75 


54 


62 


24 


2' 


106 









.858 
.840 
.843 
.829 
>27 
.F26 
.811 



CATCHERS' AVERAGES. 



10 

n 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 



NAME. 



Bennett 

Clements... 

Briody 

Ewing 

Gilligan.... 

Ganzell 

O'Kourke... 

Kelly 

i Myers 

Flint 

Daily 

McGnire. .... 

Deasley 

Tate 

1'iiBick 

Hackett I Kansas City 

Gunning Boston. 

Graves I St. Loni 



CLUB. 



Detroit , 

Philadelphia.. 
Kansas City.. 

New York 

Washington.. 

Detroit , 

New York 

Chicago 

Sr. Louis 

Chicago 

Philadelphia., 



New York..., 

BoBton 

Philadelphia.. 








li 










O 




N 




m 


<o 












>* 














- 


■ 


w 


rt 




P4 


b 


< 


M 


W 


a 


a 


a 


m 

a 


a 
*a3 


01 


U 

*03 


ts 


'A 


84 


24 


25 


H 

558 


67 


4*5 


48 


318 


52 


28 


30 


42H 


53 


258 


95 


81 


29 


413 


48 


270 


91 


31 


31 


423 


71 


358 


101 


37 


48 


511 


42 


174 


63 


33 


30 


400 


44 


250 


83 


19 


48 


4IM) 


46 


259 


94 


28 


4li 


427 


71 


368 


8o 


35 


63 


548 


49 


800 


93 


47 


41 


481 


49 


264 


55 


81 


42 


89* 


47 


298 


50 


39 


44 


431 


26 


147 


38 


15 


29 


2 9 


31 


163 


44 


27 


26 


260 


22 


110 


35 


19 


21 


195 


50 


252 


63 


25 


66 


406 


27 


162 


17 


23 


31 


216 


39 


223 


76 


39 


81 


419 



.912 

.864 
.851 
.853 
.843 
.842 
.832 
826 
.817 
.817 
.813 
.807 
.797 
.796 
.795 
.775 
.760 
.713 



BATTING AND FIELDING. 



69 



« 



o 
g 



s 1 






s 

CD 

B 
o 



I 

cr 

1 



OP -J o» CT -to CO to »* I it&PK. 



s-~sl 5 S" 
era. ro g o » 

Or*. ■ EX Pf • • 






«5 S* oa oc ;o .fa. o> e 



•S to ca if*, ex -i -i od «p 
-1 ' uiqo:c)"-c;'--)5 



a 
SB 

ft) 
• O 



Games Played. 



Games Won. 



SM K m O (i y W 
(i c* -i 3£ S3 O -i 



COO CO 



■Ml^liliH^ti 



S cotDop^SJ; First Base. 

lO @ Ol O CO -i o< cs to 



►- Ol-Jh 



Times at Bat. 



Runs Scored. 



Average per Game 



Runs Earned. 



Average per Game 






•—■-•N.OiCO-t'-J'O 
W.UClOOH-a'sCl'O 
CO -t CC t— t CC ttt. O V 



Percentage. 



Total Bases. 



eeoMMKi 



6 OS o «5 O On. US 



Average per Game, 



— •— ^ fi ■— »_. », 

*.<cuimtouttc- 

6ft CT *0»-»0'i(*- 



p S3 «- 1- s* i>* M 

**-* Tj •€ "c° *E£ **$ w* oa 

-tec -n:5l*a.'i 



COCOCOOSCOCOWCO 



QQODOO (SOB io 

'I 5> C"i — 00 O' cr- — 



C -3 CO -l Oi O « -1 



•J* CO Qt tt *. cn o-. 55 



& & QJ £ <B (J* CO jo 



SISSSSSS3S 



Baees Stolen. 



Average per Game, 



Number Put Out. 



Times Assisting. 



Fielding Errors. 



Passed Balls, 
Wild Pitches. 



Total Chances. 



Percentage 

Accepted 



CO 

► 

CD 


% 



M 

m 

CD 
0) 



I 



B 



s 

n 

a 

o* 



CO 
> 



s 3 



r» 

ss 

5" 

a 

r 

n 

*> 
n 
e 



o 



o 
a 

a 
a 



a 



Z 

a 

> 
a 

a 

ij 

w 
r 

O 

i— 

O 




70 



LEAGUE PITCHERS RECORD. 



W 

a 
o 

< 
o 

H 
W 
CQ 
< 
X 
Cu 
J 
< 



a 

o 

u 
w 
en 

fa 

K 
Ul 
X 
U 

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Irtxcoccc. ■ouOTprcOM-incniO-rpM'O-*"*: 
'- • <=. 8 . s . -. '-. '■=. '". z . - *» 1 '-. * '-. B . *. l '. ». ' 



■saoaBqo imoj. 



o~.M?on-l-n .-.' "> a — to in — OT o — :*? It 
re to to o X ~» o> -r '■■ — to >o 0» -/i 7j Jj 'S 3f--rto 



•eaqoiij pi!A\ 



•S10JJ3 Saipisij 



•3aij9jfl8v eennj, 



•^nojnjiaqmiiM 



•3SBJU80I9J 



•s)a3Tio<Ido 
Aq 8p»K 9 HII 38"SI 3 a -"!i 



•araBf) J8d 93bi3av 



•sinaa 
-oddo iq paniea enuji 



'B8U1B9 J9d eSuiSAV 



*e;aea 
-oddo i( l P9J0DS sauji 



-oddo jo itfg \e sbuitj, 



•peXBijBaraBO 



.J 
o 



3 



sa o, ssass!s t -ss* 



:SSSS 



mp^ODr.HfCT^or. '/jImoiittt.Ci'"-* 



Ci I- t3 .— i- tfi ~r — - j -o — o — o — ~. :£ CO t- 7-> 
»t-i-«»t-x lot; -. c-t — . -i o m — -ot- \z -t to 

i^ i-< O* CO -^ W Ci OJ r* rH ■Tr C* CO 0* C* C* 0* « 



556* .■. 'J*"' Mel Nc3 c» o» c* c* c* ■:* ?» 0' o*o*co cm 



» O! Zi -; CL « C T> rr £ X Oi — i - r<? ,- I - 3 CO CO 

53 ■-■ fi "* CO CO *T 01 CI co CO CO CO *T CO iO TO CO -T LO iT 



^ii-.-1"COCO^<f-0*'r-i*-'~(^i«^-0*C*C*F 



CO »<0 OJ CT1 C7S "-C O CO CO t.O i- © QC -? CO Oi CO O (O :© CO 



inai-cxc.«o^:h-oiocr<c ci co 3 -j* co 
w ^y i- t- « cc -r ift -<r co -r in »o «s"r in -w »f) t- ^' -p 



cx" ,, '" , '".cc™ x io rr.rt«XT7 c> — — 

OT^COtO-t^COTO-rCOp— "iTJ^JX-H— 71— ■« 
CI ^ ,-. i^i CI ^i ** i-i i-l r-. ?i C* ?i O* .- Ot Of C( CO TO 5i 



o r. rj i; q c -> x t. c» o m o - t t- :» k>» mi- 
co x a x « i" x c. c f ^ r? ci ^ to o in co t- 1- oj 



* CO Tl" rr TT c 



3— 1 1_ TO ,-■ -^5 Oi CO 
CO *n ^i* tp «r t iS 



* 6 *»« 



o : i; 

611 "C? 






.a a 
S ■ 



* ■ 2 : •'«.= • • : E 2 :q s g -■ 
5o-53§ Si5-3^S f IS i§Iilfi2| 

gp5Srtooopft,hoWMM^«SS5?P? 



THE LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP RECORD. 

FROM I876 TO 1SS4 INCLUSIVE. 

The record of the League championship contest each season 
from 1876 — the year the League was organized — to 18S4 inclu- 
sive, presents a very interesting array of statistics showing the 
varying features of the several clubs which have entered the 
League arena within the past nine years. This year completes 
the first decade in the history of the League organization, and 
the record of the full period will make up an exceedingly inter- 
esting history of professional ball playing in the palmiest days 
of its history. 

In the inaugural year of the League eight clubs entered the 
lists for championship, the clubs represented being Boston, 
Hartford, New York, and Philadelphia in the East, and Chi- 
cago, Cincinnati, Louisville and St. Louis in the West. The 
record for that year gave the championship to the Chicago 
Club, as will be seen by the appended table. 



(71) 



'72 RECORD OF LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



THE CIIAMHONSHII 


RECORD FOR I 


S76. 










d 


*d 


<fl 






V 




_J 


c 
c 


•tj 

g 

a. 

CO 




(A 


c 


Is 




s 


C 





"3 


3 


^ 


£ 


S 


R 












Q 








rt 


rt 


rt 




u 


K 


Cfi 


ca 


J 


>5 


< 


U 


O 


O 


c 






rt 


4 
4 


9 
8 


9 

9 
6 


7 
4 
6 


7 
9 
8 




firt 


H 


5^ 
47 

45 


Hartford 


4 
6 




9 

V 


68 




6 


6 


<V 


10 




i 


2 


4 




* 


S 


9 


10 


70 


Si 


,59 




i 


I 


4 


1 




■i 


6 


s 


66 


#> 


5° 






4 
i 

i 






3 

2 

2 




3 
3 


7 
5 


56 
59 
65 


35 
45 

56, 






i 
o 


o 

2 


i 
o 


4 
1 


14 
9 








H 


21 


19 


.V 


36 


35 


4? 





SM 


257 


^57 



In 1877 the Mutual Club of New York and the Athletic of 
Philadelphia were net among the contestants, owing- to their 
failure to fulfill their scheduled engagements of the previous sea- 
son; and consequently only five clubs of the eight which entered 
the lists in 1876 took part in the championship campaign of 1S77. 
This year Boston went to the front again while Chicago had to be 
content with the rear rank position, as will be seen by the appended 
record. 

THE RECORD FOR 1S77. 





c 


8 

a 


'> 

Q 

s 

"6* 

2 
4 


c 


rt 

6 

4 
7 

24 


"3 
►J 
th 

6 
10 

5 

"s" 

29 




be 

6 
JO 

8 
8 
4 

50 


T3 
V 

£ 
V 

E 

4 s 

4S 
4S 


(/I 

2 

£ 



17 
20 

24 
29 
30 

120 


C 

O 

CA 

U 

| 




£ 




4 
§ 

2 




24 






iS 








'7 


20 









In 1878 only six clubs took part in the season's campaign as 
in 1877; but Providence took the place of Hartford. Indianapo- 
lis filled Louisville's place, and Milwaukee that of St. Louis. 
Once more the championship honors were held by Boston, while 
Chicago pulled up to a better position than they held in 1877, as 
the appended record shows: 



We 



RECORD OF LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. TS 



THE RECORD KOR 1S7S. 

















13 
















V) 






• 


c 


















<n 










u 






V 





















a 






** 


























c 


s 


15 


c 

JO 

4 


~ 


rt 


b 

s 


rt 




6 


U 
6 


a. 

6 

9 


O 

8 
10 


*5 

n 

S 


60 




■9 
23 


O 








37 




6 


1 




6 


10 


s 


CO 


27 


31 




4 


2 


6 




8 


10 


60 


30 


3" 






8 




4 

2 




S 


(in 


36 
45 


24 
15 




1 


4 


4 


4 




60 






'9 


2} 


27 


3° 


& 


45 


360 


1S0 


1S0 



In 1879 eight clubs once more entered the lists for the League 
championship, and this number was finally fixed upon as the 
maximum of membership of the National League. In the place 
of Indianapolis and Milwaukee, Buffalo and Cleveland entered 
the race while two new members were taken in from Syracuse and 
Troy. It was in this year that George Wright left the Boston 
Club and became the manager of the rival club of that city from 
Providence, and he signalized the event by winning the pennant 
from Boston for the Providence Club, the Stars of Syracuse being 
distanced in the pennant race, while Troy made a very poor show, 
as the record below proves. 

THE RECORD FOR 1879. 










































-5 
























u 


.j 


c 


, 


c 

4) 
T3 


C 




bo 


d 


•a 

es 

a 


•0 

a 


O 


V 

V) 


ed 

s 










> 


s 


_o 


« 


u 


> 


>, 





E 


| 


E 




























Oh 


a 
s 


b 
7 


6 




10 


O 
S 


10 


6 



7S 


C 
21 


O 




55 




4 




4 


9 


7 


10 


II 


4 


7« 


2Q 


49 




5 
6 


8 




6 


3 
7 


8 


$ 




7 b 
76 


32 
32 


44 


Buflklo 


3 


6 




8 


II 


3 


Cincinnati 


2 


B 


8 


3 




8 


9 


3 


74 


3° 




4 


2 


4 


4 


4 




5 


1 


77 


53 


24 




2 


1 


3 


1 


2 


6 




4 


75 


S" 


•9 






2.1 


29 



32 


3 
32 


3 

36 


S 
53 


2 


27 


7^ 


27 

2S8 


■5 




28S 



In 1880 eight clubs again entered the arena, Worcester tak- 
ing the place of the disbanded Syracuse Stars, which club found 
their League adversaries altogether too strong for them. This 



74 RECORD OF LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



year Chicago went to the front again, Cincinna'i falling off so 
badly in the race that at the finish they were found to be badly 
distanced, as the record below shows : 



THE 


RECORI 


FOR iSSo. 














d 

« 
IS 




V 

u 
a 
u 
3 
"? 
o 


13 

C 

u 




o 

& 

H 


a 

V 

u 
C 


d 
o 

i/i 
o 

pa 


la 

3 

a 


1 

q 

'0 


»T3 

5^ 


c 

41 




c 


is 




3 
4 

2 
2 

3 
i 

2 


9 

3 

5 
6 

5 

2 
2 


s 

9 
3 

6 

s 

3 
3 


10 

7 
9 

"¥ 

7 

i 
4.2 


10 

6 
6 
S 

4 
9 
3 

43 


9 

7 

7 

i 

3 

5 

44 


ii 

10 
9 
II 

3 
9 

5 


IO 

10 

9 

IO 

S 

7 
5 

59 


*4 
»l 

<M 

? 3 
83 
S( 
S2 
.So 


■7 

32 

37 

42 

43- 

44 

59 

333 


'7 

47 






Troy Citv 








40 
2( 


Buffalo 








'7 


32 


37 


S3* 



In 1881 no change was made in the League ranks, and the 
same cities were represented in the pennant race of that year as in 
1880. Once more the Chicago club bore off the season's honors, 
that club having learned the value of team-work as a potent factor 
in winning the League championship honors. This year 
Worcester, which club made so good a fight in 1S80, fell off to 
last place, and Boston also occupied an inferior position in the 
year's campaign, their falling off during Ibbo and 1S81 being a 
feature of the year's events. Then, too, Cincinnati was forced 
to tender its resignation, and Detroit was given that club's place, 
and the new club made a very good showing in the campaign of 
'81, as will be seen by the appended record : 

RECORD OF 1881. 

























a 






4> 






jj 




C 


6 









is 




t* 







*! 


O 




rt 






V 


V) 




« 












« 












J3 





* 









> 







c 


fc 




O 


s 


H 


a 


H 


B 


u 


> 


St 












9 


_ 


I 


8 




(S 


9 
9 


*3 
«4 


?S 


47 
45 
41 




3 

5 


5 


a 


I 


9 


•V 

3 s 


Buffalo 


7 
4 


9 


3 
7 




3 


8 


7 




43 


Troy City 


4 

2 


h 


9 

4 


s 

4 




5 


ft 


4 

s 


Si 








< 


7 


8 


4 


45 


38 




h 


3 
3 


5 

5 


5 
S 


6 


4 
3 




7 


2+ 
82 


4« 
5° 


3<> 
32 




3 


8 


S 


Games Eost 


2S 


37 


38 


43 


45 


45 


4 S 


5° 




334 


334 



RECORD OF LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 75 

In 1882 the same eight clubs again entered the lists, and for 
the third time in succession Chicago carried oft" the champion- 
ship, with Providence a close second again as they were in '81 
and '80. Worcester was again badly distanced, and as a pen- 
alty the club was retired at the close of the season. The Troy 
Club, too, did not show up well this year, and they, too, shared 
the fate of the Worcesters. The record at the close stood as 
follows : 

RECORD OF 1882. 



Chicaero 

Providence.. 

Buffalo 

Boston 

Cleveland... 

Detroit 

Troy City. . . 
Worcester . . 



Games Lost 29 



39 



39 



•1" 



■I 1 



♦a 



334 334 



In 1883 New York and Philadelphia were elected as League 
cities in the place of Troy and Worcester, and this time the 
Boston Club, by a plucky rally toward the close of the season, 
managed to get in front of Chicago, the latter club being 
obliged to be content with second place. Neither New York 
or Philadelphia made much of a show in the campaign, both of 
them occupying rear positions, as will be seen by the appended 

record : 

record of 1883. 





a 


1 


c 
St 

« 

!H 
O 

7 

"i 

5 
5 

5 

2 

39 


u 
a 
6 

12 
'> 


8 
7 

"8' 
7 

5 

2 

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76 RECORD OF LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



In 1884 the same eight clubs again entered the lists, and this 
time the Providence Club took the lead of both Boston and 
Chicago, and came in victors after the most brilliant campaign 
known in the history of the club, the team toward the close 
working together as a whole in model style. New York and 
Philadelphia improved upon their previous season's record, but 
failed to reach the position in the race they had expected. 
Cleveland fell off badly in the race, and finally resigned its 
membership early in the ensuing year. The record for 1SS4 is 
as follows: 

RECORD OF 1884. 















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28 


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117 



In 1S85 Cleveland retired from the League, and St. Louis was 
elected to fill the vacancy, and again eight clubs entered the lists. 
In the pennant race both New York and Philadelphia improved 
upon their work in 1884, the former team giving the Chicago 
team a very close push for the goal, Philadelphia coming in a 
good third. The full record of the season in the championship 
arena is as follows: 

RECORD OF 1885. 









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RECORD OF LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. I 



In 1886 Providence and Buffalo were retired from the League, 
Kansas City and Washington taking their places. In the pen- 
nant race, while Chicago again took the lead, Detroit pushed 
New York back to third place, and Philadelphia had to be content 
with fourth position. The record in full is appended: 











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78 



VETERANS OF THE LEAGUE. 



THE VETERANS OF THE LEAGUE. 

Appended is President Young's record of the veterans of the 
League, giving the batting averages of players who have taken 
part in the championship contests of the League from 1S76 to 
1SS6 inclusive, as also those who played in such contests five sea- 
sons, and also within the period of the League's existence: 

HATTING AVERAGES OF PLAYERS WHO HAVE TAKEN PART IN 
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES FOR FIVE OR MORE SEASONS, 
1876 TO 1886, BOTH INCLUSIVE. 



NAME. 



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711 


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923 


3990 


811 


8103 



Anson 

Brouthers.. 

Connor 

Uore 

( O'ltourke . . 
■| Kelly 

White .. .. 

Hines 

Kicliardson 

Dalrymple. 

Start 

Dnnlap 

Howe 

Sutton 

E\vin;r 

Foley 

Shaffer .... 

Gillespie... 

Dorian 

j Clapp 

1 Peters 

I Burns 

< Bennett.... 
( Glasscock., 

Wood 

I York 

"t Ferguson . . , 
I Whitney... 
1 Morrill 

Hornung... 

Crowley 

Phillips.... 

j Purcell 

I Hotaling . . 



939 mr.: 

7838185 

761 3415 

'6 3361 



235s 
.'.522 
8759 
1945 
1296 
18' 



629 2600 

589 2431 
898 1688 
381 1 1700 
651 2054 
2272 



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2711 
2291 
2 09 
1725 
868] 
•2*21 
1796 



529.22i 3 
500.2136 
51412185 



1850 

868 
960 
927 
(258 
1074 
1120 
1252 
915 
1027 
999 
6S8 
788 
1084 
558 
»68 
602 

rso 

668 



.350 
.349 
.337 
.316 
.315 
.818 
.310 
.307 
.301 

800 
,295 

291 
.290 
,288 
.-"•7 
.284 
.281 

277 
'276 



165 .275 
«6H .275 
.271 



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.371 
273 
209 
268 



46(1 .3C0 
!-82 .266 
7511 .205 
171 .»64 
581 ,.263 
559 .261 
5721.261 



VETERANS OF THE LEAGUE. 79 

ayerag Ks — Continued. 



30 

31 
82 
33 
84 

35 

36 
87 

38 

39 

40 

41 
42 
43 
44 

45 

46 
47 

48 

49 
SO 
51 
52 



54 
55 



Brown 

Hanlon 

Wise 

Williamson 

Manning... 

Farrell 

Wright 

CaBsidy 

Burdock — 

Denny 

Ward 

Ilouck 

Irwin 

Radbourne. 

Flint 

McUeary 

i Remsen.... 

Welch 

j ft vans .;... 
j Caskine.... 

Harbridge.. 

McCormick. 

Bradley.... 

Eggler 

( Clueet 

"f Bond 

Goldsmith., 

Gerhardt... 

Briody , 

Uanklnson. 

Snyder 

Corcoran 

Galvln 

Creamer ... 

Force 

GUllgan.... 

llolbert.... 

Bus hong 

Weldman... 



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279 
233 
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200 
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807 
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Official League Ball 

Spalding's League Rail is now recognized as the standard in every part 
of the wor d whrre base ball is played. It was first introduced in 1876, and 
made under specifications designed by A. G. Spalding whose long con- 
nection with the game had given him a knowledge of the requirements of a 
first-class ball not possessed by any other manufacturer. Kvery pains was 
taken with its manufacture, and it soon became very popular among 1 pro- 
fessional players on account of its uniformity, elasticity and durability, 
which resulted in i's being adopted as the official ball of the National 
League in 1878, and has been readopted every year since by the leading 
associations, including 1SS7. 

m The large sale and great demand for this ball has brought out many 
imitators, who would pirate on our trade and reputation by offering an in- 
ferior article at a lower price, and endeavor to create the impression that 
these inferior low grade balls are the same, or are equal to Spalding's 
Official League. We would cau'ion ball players against infringements, and 
urge them not to be misled by the misrepresentations of dealers whose in- 
creased profits on the cheap goods may have something to do with their 
statements. 

Our League Ball can be obtained of any first-class dealer in base ball 
supplies, to whom a liberal trade discount is allowed. 

The following base ball Jpagucs and associations have adopted the 
Spalding League Ball as the official ball of their associations for iS87 t and 
by their regulations, all championship games played during the season, this 
ball must be used: 

THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 

Composed of the following Clubs: 

Chicago, New York, Boston, Detroit, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Kansas 
City and Washington. 

THE NEW ENGLAND LEAGUE. 
Composed of Boston, Haverhill, Manchester, Lawrence, PortlanJ and 
Lowell. 

THE INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE. 

Composed of Utica, Rochester, Syracuse, Binghamton, Oswcgp, Buf- 
falo, Hamilton and Toronto, Ont., Jersey City and Newark. 

THE EASTERN LEAGUE, 

THE NORTHWESTERN LEAGUE, 
THE WESTERN LEAGUE, 

THE AMERICAN COLLEGE ASS'N, 
THE NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE ASS'N, 
THE NEW YORK INTER STATE COLLEGE AES'N. 



We refer with considerable pride to the following Resolution unanimous- 
ly adopted at the recent annual meeting of the American College Associa- 
tion, held at Springfield, Mass., March 12, 1886 

"#<r.«>M?</, that the American College Association in unanimously adopt- 
ing Spalding's League Ball for 1886, express their great satisfaction which 
this ball gave the Association last year, aad also cheerfully indorse it as 
the best ball they have ever used." 



_ 




No. 1. -Spalding's Official League Ball, as adopted by 
the National League for 1S87 each ball wrapped in tin 
toll, and put up in a separate box as represented in the To Clubs 

above illustration, and sealed in accordance with the Each. Per doz. 
latest league regulations. Warranted to last a full 
game without ripping or losing its elasticity or shape. 
Mailed upon receipt of price $, JO ),;„ 




Spalding's Trademarked Catchers' Mask. 

The suit for infringement on 
Catchers' Masks brought, against us 
by F. W. Thayer of Boston (for- 
merly catcher of the I larvard Col- 
lege nine), was after a two years' 
litigation decided against us by 
Judge Blodgett in the U. S. District 
Court, and in settlement for back 
damages we arranged to protect all 
of our customers who had purchased 
r^*— r ^" *^T t< * [ masks of us in the past, and we took 

* i. license from said Thayer to manu- 
facture in future under his patent, 
p~ ;'ing him a royalty on each mask, 
mac'e. 

On account of this royalty we are 
forcec to slightly advance the priceon 
catcher's masks, though we have at 
the same time improved the quality. 
Dealers in Rase Ball Goods are cau- 
tioned against buying any Catchers' 
:"• "'"'•v&J Masks unless made under license 

from Thayer, and plainly stamped "Manufacturec under Thayer's Patent." 
At present it would be considered unsafe and even dangerous for a 
catcher to face the swift underhand throwing of the present day unless 
protected by a reliable mask. The increased demand for these goods has 
brought manufacturers ir>to the field who, having no reputation to sustain, 
have vied with each other to see how cheaply they could make a so-called 
mask, and in consequence haveignored the essential qualification, strength. 
A cheaply made, interior quality of mask is much worse than no protection 
at all, for a broken wire, or one that will not stand the force of the ball 
without caving in, is liable to disfigure a player for life. Our trademarked 
masks are made of the very best hard wire, plated to prevent rusting, and 
well trimmed, and every one is a thorough face protector. We make them 
m three grades as described below. 

Beware of counterfeits. None genuine without our Trademark stamped 
on each Mask. 

No. 00.— Spalding's Special League Mask, used by all the leading Each. 
professional catchers, extra heavy wire, well padded with goat 
hair, and the padding faced with the best imported dogskin, 
which is impervious to perspiration and retains its pliability and 

softness $3 5° 

No. O.— Spalding's Regulation League Mask, made of heavy wire, 
well padded and faced with horse-hide, warranted first-class in 

every respect 3 °° 

No. 1.— Spalding's Boy's League Mask, made of heavy wire, equally 
as heavy in proportion to size as the No. oo mask. It is made to 
fit a boy's face, and gives the same protection as the League 
Mask 2 5° 

CHEAP MASKS. 

To meet the demand for good masks at a low price, we have manufact- 
ured a line of cheap masks, which are superior to any ma'-ks in the market 
at the same price. We do not guarantee these masks, ana believe that our 
Trademarked Masks are worth more than the difference in price. 
No. A. — Amateur Mask, made the same size and general style as the E*ck. 
League Mask, but with lighter wire and faced with leather (we 
guarantee this Mask to be superior to so-called league or profes- 
sional masks sold by other manufacturers) $i 75 

No- B.— Boy's Amateur Mask, similar to the No. A mask, only 

made s maller to fit a boy's face i 5° 

|y Any of the above masks mailed postpaid on receipt of price. 



\ 




SPALDING'S TRADE MARKED CATCHERS' 
CLOVES. 

After considerable ex- 
pense and many experi- 
ments, we have finally 
perfected a Catchers' 
Glove that meets with 
general favor from pro- 
fessional catchers. 

The old style of open 
backed gloves introduced 
by us several years ago is 
still adhered to, but the 
quality of material and 
workmanship has been 
materially improved, un- 
til now we are justified in 
claiming the best line of 
catchers's gloves in the 
market. These Gloves do 
not interfere with throw- 
ing, can be easily put on 
and taken off, and no plaver subj-ct to sore hands should be without a pair. 
We make them in ten different grades, as follows: 
No. 000.— Spalding's Special League Catchers' Gloves. Full left 
hand, back stop glove, made of the heaviest Indian- 
tanned buckskm, the very best that can be procured. 
The full left hand glove is extra padded, and sole leath- 
er finger tips, to prevent the low curved balls irom 
breaking or otherwise injuring the fingers. The right 
hand glove is made with open back and fingerless, thor- 
oughly padded Price per Pair, $ 5 00 

No. 00.— Spalding's League Regulation Catchers' Gloves, 
made of extra heavy Indian-tanned buck, and carefully 
selected with reference to the hard service required of 
them. This Glove has full left hand, as shown in the 
illustration, with fingerless right hand, well padded, 

a nd warranted Price per Pair, 3 50 

No. 0. --Spalding's League Catchers' Gloves, made of extra 
heavy Indian-tanned buck, and carefully selected with 
spenal reference 10 the hard service required of them, 
open back, both hands fingerless, well padded, and 

ful 1 y warranted " Price per Pair, 2 50 

No. 1.— Spalding's Professional Gloves, made of Indian-tanned 
buckskin, open back, well padded, but not quite as 

heavy material as the No. o Price per Pair a 00 

The above Gloves are Trade Marked and fully warranted. 

AMATEUR CATCHERS' CLOVES. 

To meet the demand for a cheaper grade of Gloves, we have added the 
following line: 

No. A.— Full Left Hand Catchers' Gloves, equal to most profes- 
sional gloves in the market Price per Pair, 



No. B. — Amateur Gloves, made of buckskin, open back, well pad- 

r Pair 



$z 50 
I 50 



ded, and adapted for amateur players Per 

No. C— Practice Gloves, made of light material, open back, well 

padded Per Pair 1 00 

No. D.— Junior Gloves, open back, a good glove at the price '* 75 

No. E.— Cheap open back glove " 50 

No F — " " " " « 35 

J3^"Any of the above Gloves mailed postpaid on receipt of price. In 
ordering, please give size of ordinary dress gloves usually worn. 

A. O. SPALDING &, BROS., 



108 Madlaon St., CHICAGO, 



811 Broadway, NEW TOSK. 



Gray's Patent Body Protector. 

The most useful device ever in- 
vented for the protection of catchers 
or umpires, and renders it impossi- 
ble for the catcher to be injured 
while playing close to the batter. 
Made very light and pliable, and 
does not interfere in any way with 
the movements of the wearer, either 
in running, stooping or throwing. 
No catcher should be without one of 
these protectors. 

Price, each, $10.00. 

MORTON'S 

Patent Sliding Pad, 

A NECESSITY TO BALL PLAYERS. 

The Sliding Pad protects thefii'e 
and hip of the player when undi r- 
laking to slide for a base. 

Its use increases a player's con- 
fidence, and renders the act of 
sliding free from danger. 

It is worn and recommended by 
all leading professional ball play- 
ers. 
No. o. Chamois lined, price 

each by mail $> 50 

No. 1. All Canvas, price 

each by mail 1 50 

"I have examined and used Morton's Sliding- I*ad, and can say th^t I 

- of them on, and think every ball 
M.J. KELLY, 

Chicago B. B, t\ 

*ftd, and have ordered them for 

CHAS. C'OMISKEY, 
Capt. St. Louis Browns B. B. C. 

A. O. SPALDING & BROS., 

108 Madison St., CHICAGO. 341 Broadway, NEW YORK. 




would not go on the ball field without ont 
player should have them." 

"I have examined Morton's Sliding 
our team." 



SPALDING'S SCORE BOOK. 



Spalding's new design Pocket and Cluh Score Book continues to be the 
popular score book, and is used by all the leading scorers and base ball 
reporters. They are adapted for the spectator of hall games, who scores 
for his own amusement, as well as the official club scorer, who records the 
minutest detail. By this new system, the art of scoring can be acquired in 
a single game. 

Full instructions, with the latest League rules, accompany each book. 



WHAT AUTHORITIES SAY OF IT. 

Messrs. A. G. Spaldinc; & Bkos., Chicago, 111. 

Gentlemen" — I have carefully examinedthc Spalding Score Book, and, 
without any hesitation, 1 cheerfully recommend it as the most complete 
system of scoring of which I have any knowledge. 

Respectfully, 
N. E. YOUNG, President Nat'l League P. B. B. Clubs. 



The new system of score books just issued by A. G. Spalding & Bros, of 
Chicago, are the neatest thing of the kind we ever saw. Every lov r of the 
game should have one. They are simple in their construction, and are easily 
understood. — Cincinnati Enquirer, 

The Tribl'NE has received from A. G. Spalding & Bros., 10S Madison 
Street, a copy of their new score book for use this year. The book or system 
is so far in advance of anyth ng ever before brought out in the way of sim- 
plicity, convenience and accuracy, that it seems wonderful that it was not 
thought of years ago. The new style will be in universal use before the 
season is half through.' — Chicago Tribune. 

A. G. Spalding, Captain of the Chicago White Stockings, has just, hrough t 
out a new score book, which will meet with the unqualified indorsement of 
everybody who has ever undertaken to score a game of base ball. They arc 
of various sizes, to meet the requirements both of the spectator who scores 
simply for his own satisfaction, and for offici .1 s ores of clubs. The novel 
and commending feature of the book is the manner in which each of the 
squares opposite the name of the player is utilized bv a division which 
originated with Mr. Spalding. Each of these squares is divided into five 
spaces by a diamond in its center, from the points of which lines extend to 
each of the four sides of the square. Each of these spaces is designed for 
(he use of the scorer according to marks and signs given in the book. By 
thus dividing the squares into spaces he scores without the liability to make 
mistakes. The League rules of scoring arc printed in the book.— ..V. T.Clipper. 

POCKET. 

.. _ _ EACH. 

No. i. Paper Cover, 7 games $ tl0 

Sn. 2. Board Cover, 22 games "' t2 e 

No. \. Board Cover, 46 games .", *c 

-core Cards .oi 

CLUB BOOKS. 

\'o. 4. Large Size, 30 games $, <*, 

■- .. Large " 60 games 1 7 e 

*j" . Large " 90 games .".!.....'.*".'" 2 !co 

N o. 7. I .arge « 1 20 games 3 -03 

Mailed upon receipt of price. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



108 Madison Street, 
CHICAGO. 



241 Broadway, 

BHW YOEK, 



SPALDING'S TRADE MARKED BATS. 

Spalding's Trade Marked Bats ■were first introduced in 18^7, and they 
have gradually grown into popularity, until now they are used almost ex- 
clusively by all prominent professional and amateur players. All the tim- 
ber used in these bats is allowed to season from one to two years before 
being made up, and the resu't is we are enabled to make much lighter and 
stronger bats than where the timber is hastily "kiln-dried," as done by 
nearly all manufacturers of cheap goods. Each bat is turned by hand, after 
the most approved and varied models, and if found to answer the require- 
ments as to weight, size, length, etc., the Trade Mark is stamped on each 
bat to insure its genuineness. The success and popularity of these bats, 
which is due to the very great care that has been taken in their manufact- 
ure, have brought out many cheap imitations and we would caution the 
trade to see that the Spalding Trade Mark is stamped on each bat. 

Each. To 
No. OO.— Spalding's Special Black Band League Bat. made Clubs, 
out of the choicest white selected, second growth ash, on per doz. 
the most approved models, as recommended and used by 
League players. Kach bat is carefully weighed, and the 
weight stamped in ounces under the Trade Mark. Each 
Bat is encased in a strong paper bag, lathe polished, and 
guaranteed to be the finest bat maue. Having purchased 
the patent of Wm. Gray, of Hartford, Conn., covering the 
use of a granulated handle, and believing it to have great 
merit in preventing the hand from slipping, we have decid- 
ed to use it on this grade of bats $ 75 $7 50 

No. 0-— Spalding's Black Band League Bat, made on the 
most approved model, as rerommended by prominent 
League players. These bats are made from the best se- 
lected ash, lathe polished, weighed and stamped, each bat 

encased in a strong paper bag 50 5 50 

No. 1. — Spalding's Trade Marked ABh Bat, made on three 
different models, finished with two coats of the besc orange 
shellac, and lathe prlished, 35 to 38 inches. Each bat 
weighed and stamped with -weight in ounces under the 

Trade Mark 40 4 00 

No. 3.— Spalding's Trademarked Basswood Bats, light 
weight, clear, while selected timber, lathe polished, 36 to 39 
inches. Each bat weighed and stamped with weight in 

ounces under the Trademark 30 3 00 

No. 4. — Spalding's Trademarked Willow Bats, light weight, 
large handles, lathe polish* d, each bat encased in a strong 
paper bag. The best light wood bat made, 36 to 39 inches. 
Each bat weigh' d and stamped with weight in ounces 

under the Trademark 50 5 50 

No.*"OB.— Spalding's Black Band Trademarked Boys' Ash 

Bat. This bat is highly finished, made from selected 

timber, and finished in same manner as our No. 00 bat 

stamped; weight; encased in paper b >g; 30 to 34 inches.. .. 30 3 00 

No. IB. — Spalding's Trademarked Boys' Ash Bat, finished 

same as No.* 1. 30 to 34 inchns 25 a 50 

No. 3B.— Spalding's Trademarked Boys' Basswood Bats, 

finished s ime as No. 3, 30 to 34 25 2 50 

No. AA.— Spalding's Trademarked Fancy Ash Bats, finished 
in a light mahogany color, with patent granulated handle. 
Very highly polished, put up in strong paper cases. Each 

bat weight- d and stamped 75 7 5° 

No. BB.— Spalding's Trademarked Fancy Basswood Bats, 
finished in a handsome mahogany color. Each bat weighed 
and stamped. Vtry highly polished, put up in strong 
paper cases 75 7 50 

PLAIN FINISHED BATS. Each. Pr.doz. 

No. 6. — Men's Ash, Plain finish, ass'd length, 36 to 39 in. % 20 $1 50 

'* 7. — " Basswood, ** " *' •* 36103910. 15 1 35 

** P. — Boy's Ash, ** M ** •* a3 to 33 in. 10 1 00 

f * ©.— « Basswood. '• " " •• sS to ja in. 10 1 00 



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